Thucydides, Volume 4

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W. Heinemann, 1921 - Greece
 

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Page 131 - Lacedaemonians slowly and to the music of many flute-players — a standing institution in their army, that has nothing to do with religion, but is meant to make them advance evenly, stepping in time, without breaking their order, as large armies are apt to do in the moment of engaging.
Page 167 - Well, as to the kindness of the divine favour, neither do we expect to fall short of you therein. For in no respect are we departing from men's observances regarding that which pertains to the divine or from their desires regarding that which pertains to themselves, in aught that we demand or do. For of the gods we hold the belief, and of men we know, that by a necessity of their nature wherever they have power they always rule.
Page 179 - ... certain men in their city, seized some of them, but the rest escaped. About the same time the Melians again at another point took a part of the Athenian encompassing wall, the garrison not being numerous. But later, in consequence of these occurrences, another force came from Athens, of which Philocrates son of Demeas was commander, and the Melians, being now closely besieged — some treachery, too, having made its appearance among them — capitulated to the Athenians on the condition that...
Page 177 - The Athenian envoys returned to the army; and the generals, when they found that the Melians would not yield, immediately commenced hostilities. They surrounded the town of Melos with a wall, dividing the work among the several contingents. They then left troops of their own and of their allies to keep guard both by land and by sea, and retired with the greater part of their army; the remainder carried on the blockade.
Page 167 - For of the gods we hold the belief, and of men we know, that by a necessity of their nature wherever they have power they always rule. And so in our case since we neither enacted this law nor when it was enacted were the first to use it, but found it in existence and expect to leave it in existence for urea, etSVec Kai //с v Kai aXXou ev rfj avrfj >vv/et rMV yevo/vovc Spuv3 то? av TOUT. /eat тт/эос /tel...
Page 169 - We must indeed acknowledge that with respect to themselves and the institutions of their own country, the Lacedaemonians practiced virtue in a very high degree, but with respect to their conduct towards the rest of mankind, . . . one may declare that of all men with whom we are acquainted they, most conspicuously, consider what is agreeable to be honorable, and what is expedient, just" (Loeb Classical Library, transl.
Page 167 - ... we trust that, in point of fortune, we shall through the divine favour be at no disadvantage because we are god-fearing men standing our ground against men who are unjust; and as to the matter of power, that the alliance of the Lacedaemonians will supply what we lack, since that alliance must aid us, if for no other reason, because of our kinship with them and for very shame. . . . Athenians: Well, as to the kindness of the divine favour, neither do we expect to fall short of you therein. For...
Page 169 - ... Realism For of the gods we believe, and of men we know, that by a necessity of their nature wherever they have power they always rule. And so in our case since we neither enacted this law nor when it was enacted were the first to use it, but found it in existence and expect to leave it in existence for all time, so we make use of it, well aware that both you and others, if clothed with the same power as we are, would do the same thing. — Speech of the Athenians to the Melians, Thucydides' History...
Page 159 - Rather we presume that you aim at accomplishing what is possible in accordance with the real thoughts of both of us, since you know as well as we know that what is just is arrived at in human arguments only when the necessity on both sides is equal, and that the powerful exact what they can, while the weak yield what they...
Page 159 - ... the Persians, or that we now come against you because we are injured, offering in a lengthy speech arguments that would not be believed; nor, on the other hand, do we presume that you will assert, either that the reason why you did not join us in the war was because you were colonists of the Lacedaemonians, or that you have done us no wrong. Rather we presume that you aim at accomplishing what is possible in accordance with the real thoughts of both of us, since you know as well as we know that...