The Code of Alabama: Adopted by Act of the General Assembly ... Approved February 16, 1897 ... with Such Statutes Passed at the Session of 1896-97, as are Required to be Incorporated Therein by Act Approved February 17, 1897 and with Citations to the Decisions of the Supreme Court of the State Construing Or Mentioning the Statutes ...

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Foote & Davies Company, printers, 1897 - Law
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Page 8 - And the Articles of this Confederation shall be inviolably observed by every State ; and the Union shall be perpetual. Nor shall any alteration at any time hereafter be made in any of them, unless such alteration be agreed to, in a Congress of the United States, and be afterwards confirmed by the legislatures of every State.
Page 6 - ... ..of establishing rules for deciding in all cases, what captures on land or water shall be legal, and in what manner prizes taken by land or naval forces in the service of the United States shall be divided or appropriated..
Page 22 - It is hereby ordained and declared by the authority aforesaid, That the following articles shall be considered as articles of compact, between the original states and the people and states in the said territory, and forever remain unalterable, unless by common consent, to wit: ARTICLE i.
Page 5 - When land forces are raised by any state for the common defence, all officers of or under the rank of colonel shall be appointed by the legislature of each state respectively, by whom such forces shall be raised, or in such manner as such state shall direct ; and all vacancies shall be filled up by the state which first made the appointment.
Page 23 - The navigable waters leading into the Mississippi and St. Lawrence, and the carrying places between the same shall be common highways and forever free, as well to the inhabitants of the said territory, as to the citizens of the United Slates, and those of any other states that may be admitted into the confederacy, without any tax, impost, or duty therefor.
Page 4 - Congress by less than two nor by more than seven members ; and no person shall be capable of being a delegate for more than three years in any term of six years; nor shall any person, being a delegate, be capable of holding any office under the United States, for which he, or another for his benefit, receives any salary, fees, or emolument of any kind.
Page 24 - There shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude in the said territory, otherwise than in the punishment of crimes, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted: Provided always, That any person escaping into the same, from whom labor or service is lawfully claimed in any one of the original States, such fugitive may be lawfully reclaimed, and conveyed to the person claiming his or her labor or service as aforesaid.
Page 4 - The better to secure and perpetuate mutual friendship and intercourse among the people of the different States in this Union, the free inhabitants of each of these States, (paupers, vagabonds, and fugitives from justice excepted,) shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of free citizens in the several States...
Page 5 - No State shall engage in any war without the consent of the United States in Congress assembled, unless such State be actually Invaded by enemies, or shall have received certain advice of a resolution being formed by some nation of Indians to Invade such State, and the danger is so imminent as not to admit of a delay till the United States in Congress assembled can be consulted...
Page 7 - ... proportion to the number of white inhabitants in such state; which requisition shall be binding, and thereupon the legislature of each state shall appoint the regimental officers, raise the men and clothe, arm and equip them in a soldierlike manner, at the expense of the United States; and the officers and men so clothed, armed and equipped shall march to the place appointed, and within the time agreed on by the United States in Congress assembled...

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