Africa in International Politics: External Involvement on the Continent

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Ian Taylor, Paul Williams
Psychology Press, 2004 - Political Science - 225 pages
Locating Africa on the global stage, this book examines and compares external involvement in the continent, exploring the foreign policies of major states and international organizations towards Africa. The contributors work within a political economy framework in order to study how these powers have attempted to stimulate democracy, peace and prosperity in the context of neo-liberal hegemony and ask whom these attempts have benefited and failed.
 

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Contents

understanding Africas place in world politics
1
The contending currents in United States involvement in subSaharan Africa
23
Britain and Africa after the Cold War beyond damage limitation?
41
Frances policy towards Africa continuity or change?
61
The allweather friend? SinoAfrican interaction in the twentyfirst century
83
Russia and Africa moving in the right direction?
102
JapanAfrica relations patterns and prospects
116
Canada and Africa activist aspirations in straitened circumstances
136
The European Unions external relations with Africa after the Cold War aspects of continuity and change
155
The international financial institutions relations with Africa insights from the issue of representation and voice
174
From Congo to Congo United Nations peacekeeping in Africa after the Cold War
195
Index
213
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About the author (2004)

Ian Taylor is a senior lecturer in African politics at the University of Botswana and a visiting research fellow in the Department of Political Science, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa. Paul Williams is a lecturer in security studies at the University of Birmingham, UK.

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