A narrative by John Ashburnham of his attendance on King Charles the First from Oxford to the Scotch Army, and from Hampton-Court to the Isle of Wight ... to which is prefixed a vindication of his character ... and conduct, from the misrepresentations of Lord Clarendon

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Payne and Foss, 1830 - Great Britain
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Page liii - Dear Robin, our fleshly reasonings ensnare us. These make us say, 'heavy,' 'sad,' 'pleasant,' 'easy.' Was there not a little of this when Robert Hammond, through dissatisfaction too, desired retirement from the Army, and thought of quiet in the Isle of Wight ? > Did not God find him out there ? I believe he will never forget this.
Page 3 - A jest's prosperity lies in the ear • Of him that hears it, never in the tongue Of him that makes it : then, if sickly ears, Deaf 'd with the clamours of their own dear groans.
Page xli - ... sum of money received by me or by any other person or persons by my order or to my knowledge or belief for my use on account or in respect of the said estate or business. 2. The several sums of money mentioned in the said...
Page liii - That it is lawful for a lesser part, if in the right, to force [a numerical majority] &c. To the first: call not your burden sad or heavy. If your Father laid it upon you, He intended neither. He is the Father of lights, from whom comes every good and perfect gift, who of His own will begot us, and...
Page lviii - Thou mentionest somewhat as if, by acting against such opposition as is like to be, there will be a tempting- of God. Dear Robin, tempting of God ordinarily is either by acting presumptuously in carnal confidence, or in unbelief through diffidence : both these ways Israel tempted God in the wilderness, and He was grieved by them. Not the encountering- [of] difficulties, therefore, makes us to tempt God ; but the acting before and without faith...
Page lii - Thou desirest to hear of my experiences. I can tell thee : I am such a one as thou didst formerly know, having a body of sin and death ; but I thank God, through Jesus Christ our Lord there is no condemnation, though much infirmity ; and I wait for the redemption. And in this poor condition I obtain mercy, and sweet consolation through the Spirit. And find abundant cause every day to exalt the Lord, and abase flesh, — and herein * I have some exercise.
Page 126 - Intelligence came to the hands of a very considerable Person, That the King attempted to get out of his window ; and that he had a cord of silk with him whereby to slip down, but his breast was so big the bar would not give him passage.
Page lix - God, and neither of them to be reasoned into, because the heart is deceitful), — been occasioned to overlook what is just and honest, and to think the people of God may have as much or more good the one way than the other? Good by this Man, — against whom the Lord hath witnessed ; and whom thou knowest ! Is this so in their hearts ; or is it reasoned, forced in ?35 Robin, I have done.
Page lvi - My dear Friend, let us look into providences; surely they mean somewhat. They hang so together; have been so constant, so clear, unclouded. Malice, swoln malice against God's people, now called "Saints...
Page cliv - You cannot be without me; you will fall to ruin if I do not sustain you.' At length the loyal Berkeley whispered to him, 'Sir, your Majesty speaks as if you had some secret strength and power that I do not know of; and since your Majesty hath concealed it from me, I wish you had concealed it from these men too.

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