The Divine Comedy

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Penguin, May 27, 2003 - Poetry - 928 pages
121 Reviews

The Divine Comedy, translated by Allen Mandelbaum, begins in a shadowed forest on Good Friday in the year 1300. It proceeds on a journey that, in its intense recreation of the depths and the heights of human experience, has become the key with which Western civilization has sought to unlock the mystery of its own identity.

Mandelbaum’s astonishingly Dantean translation, which captures so much of the life of the original, renders whole for us the masterpiece of that genius whom our greatest poets have recognized as a central model for all poets.

This Everyman’s edition–containing in one volume all three cantos, Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso–includes an introduction by Nobel Prize—winning poet Eugenio Montale, a chronology, notes, and a bibliography. Also included are forty-two drawings selected from Botticelli's marvelous late-fifteenth-century series of illustrations.

(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)

 

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Review: The Divine Comedy (The Divine Comedy #1-3)

User Review  - Bob - Goodreads

Not my kettle of fish. Couldn't read without frequent stops. Perhaps above my IQ level, or just not my kettle of fish. Read full review

Review: The Divine Comedy (The Divine Comedy #1-3)

User Review  - S. - Goodreads

Amazing. Influential. Significant. Beautiful. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Canto XVIII
Canto XIX
Canto XX
Canto XXI
Canto XXII
Canto XXIII
Canto XXIV
Canto XXV

Canto VIII
Canto IX
Canto X
Canto XI
Canto XII
Canto XIII
Canto XIV
Canto XV
Canto XVI
Canto XVII
Canto XVIII
CantoXIX Canto XX
Canto XXI
Canto XXII
Canto XXIII
Canto XXIV
Canto XXV
Canto XXVI
Canto XXVII
Canto XXVIII
CantoXXXI CantoXXXII Canto XXXIII
Canto XXXIV
THE PURGATORIO
Canto I
Canto II
Canto III
Canto IV
Canto V
Canto VI
Canto VII
Canto VIII
Canto IX
Canto X
Canto XI
Canto XII
Canto XIII
Canto XIV
Canto XV
Canto XVI
Canto XVII
Canto XXVI
Canto XXVII
Canto XXVIII
Canto XXIX
CantoXXX CantoXXXI Canto XXXII
Canto XXXIII
THE PARADISO
Canto I
Canto II
Canto III
Canto IV
Canto V
Canto VI
Canto VII
Canto VIII
Canto IX
Canto X
Canto XI
Canto XII
Canto XIII
Canto XIV
Canto XV
Canto XVI
Canto
XVIII
Canto XIX
Canto XX
Canto XXI
Canto XXII
Canto
XXIV
Canto XXV
XXVI
Canto XXVII
XXVIII
CantoXXIX Canto XXX
Canto XXXI
Canto XXXII
XXXIII
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About the author (2003)

Dante Alighieri, born in Florence, Italy, c. 1265, is considered one of the world's greatest poets. His use of the Florentine dialect established it as the basis for modern Italian. His late medieval epic, The Divine Comedy, was above all inspired, as was all his poetry, by his unrequited love for Beatrice, a woman he may have seen only from afar. He died in 1321, having completed his great work, yet an exile from his native city.

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