The Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets: Prior. Congreve. Blackmore. Fenton. Gay. Granville. Yalden. Tickell. Hammond. Somervile. Savage. Swift. Broome

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T. Longman, 1794 - English poetry
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Page 206 - Thus had Savage perished by the evidence of a bawd, a strumpet, and his mother, had not justice and compassion procured him an advocate of rank too great to be rejected unheard, and of virtue too eminent to be heard without being believed.
Page 178 - Corner, where they stopped at a petty tavern, and retired to a private room. Sir Richard then informed him, that he intended to publish a pamphlet, and that he had desired him to come thither that he might write for him.
Page 104 - First Book of Oppian. He had begun a tragedy of Dion, but made small progress in it. As to his other affairs, he died poor, but honest, leaving no debts or legacies ; except of a few pounds to Mr.
Page 348 - What other subject, through all art or nature, could have produced Tindal for a profound author, or furnished him with readers ? It is the wise choice of the subject, that alone adorns and distinguishes the writer.
Page 116 - The person who acted Polly, till then obscure, became all at once the favourite of the Town. Her pictures were engraved and sold in great numbers, her life written, books of letters and verses to her published, and pamphlets made even of her sayings and jests.
Page 117 - Opera the gangs of robbers were evidently multiplied. Both these decisions are surely exaggerated. The play, like many others, was plainly written only to divert, without any moral purpose, and is therefore not likely to do good; nor can it be conceived, without more speculation than life requires or admits, to be productive of much evil. Highwaymen and housebreakers seldom frequent the playhouse, or mingle in any elegant diversion; nor is it possible for any one to imagine that he may rob with safety,...
Page 55 - Whistling thro' hollows of this vaulted isle : We'll listen— LEONORA. Hark! ALMERIA. No, all is hush'd and still as death. — 'Tis dreadful .' How reverend is the face of this tall pile; Whose ancient pillars rear their marble heads, To bear aloft its arch'd and ponderous roof, By its own weight made...
Page 335 - ... nothing will supply the want of prudence; and that negligence and irregularity, long continued, will make knowledge useless, wit ridiculous, and genius contemptible.
Page 161 - ... my very soul to think on. For a man of high spirit, conscious of having (at least in one production) generally pleased the world, to be plagued and threatened by wretches that are low in every sense ; to be forced to drink himself into pains of the body, in order to get rid of the pains of the mind, is a misery.
Page 354 - Oxford ; written without much knowledge of the general nature of language, and without any accurate inquiry into the history of other tongues. The certainty and stability which, contrary to all experience, he thinks attainable, he proposes to secure by instituting an academy ; the decrees of which every man would have been willing, and many would have been proud to disobey, and which, being renewed by successive elections, would, in a short time, have differed from itself. Swift now attained the...

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