The Enigma of Arrival

Front Cover
Pan Macmillan, 2002 - England - 387 pages
76 Reviews
Taking its title from a picture by surrealist painter Giorgio de Chirico, this is the story of a young Indian from the Crown Colony of Trinidad, who arrives in post-imperial England. He observes the gradual but profound changes wrought on the English countryside by the march of progress.

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Magnificent writing. - Goodreads
very repetitive writing style and self-indulgent. - Goodreads
The prose perfectly f - Goodreads
No real plot to speak of but still absorbing. - Goodreads

Review: The Enigma of Arrival: A Novel in Five Sections

User Review  - Fan - Goodreads

My first encounter with Naipaul, and after that I immediately read several of his other books. He's a master of language and style. Reading this book is like walking along a peaceful, meandering river at sunset. You're happy yet you want to cry, too, for some reason. Read full review

Review: The Enigma of Arrival: A Novel in Five Sections

User Review  - Fan - Goodreads

My first encounter with Naipaul, and after that I immediately read several of his other books. He's a master of language and style. Reading this book is like walking along a peaceful, meandering river at sunset. You're happy yet you want to cry, too, for some reason. Read full review

About the author (2002)

Vidiadhar Surajprasad (V. S.) Naipaul was born on August 17, 1932. He was born of Hindu parents in Trinidad. V. S. Naipaul was educated at Oxford University and has lived in Great Britain since 1950. With an exile's sensibility, Naipaul's writing is concerned with both the West Indies of his childhood and his strong identification with India. A House for Mr. Biswas (1961), his most well-known work, solidified his reputation as a novelist. It tells the tragicomic story of the search for independence and identity of a Brahmin Indian living in Trinidad. Naipaul's work, even when he appears to be analyzing a picturesque character, is really an analysis of the entire society of Trinidad. The Middle Passage (1962) extends this analysis of the social order to other areas of the West Indies. His novel, A Bend in the River (1979) set in a new African nation, depicts the difficulties ordinary people face during times of political upheaval. A Turn in the South (1989) is a sensitive portrayal of the American South. Naipaul is regarded by many as one of the best writers of our time, and he is a perennial nominee for the Nobel Prize in Literature, which he finally won on October 11, 2001.

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