Prof. H. Kling's Modern orchestration and instrumentation: or, The art of instrumentation; containing detailed descriptions of the character and peculiarities of all instruments and their practical employment ...

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C. Fischer, 1905 - Instrumentation and orchestration - 346 pages
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OCLC Number: 8538902
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Instrumentation and orchestration.
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Page 3 - ... and in the course of their pieces. I do not mean by this to say that it is necessary to imitate the mathematical regularity of the metronome ; all music so performed would become of freezing stiffness...
Page 302 - ... music will have the unity of the symphonic movement; and this it will attain by spreading itself over the whole drama, in the most intimate cohesion therewith, not merely over single smaller, arbitrarily selected parts. So that this unity consists in a tissue of root themes pervading all the drama, themes which contrast, complete, reshape, divorce, and intertwine with one another as in the symphonic movement; only that here the needs of the dramatic action dictate the laws of parting and combining,...
Page 2 - ... the author's intentions, a work with which the performers have already become acquainted, but he has also to give them this acquaintance when the work in question is new to them. He has to criticize the errors and defects of each during the rehearsals, and to organise the resources at his disposal in such a way as to make the best use he can of them with the utmost promptitude. For, in the majority of European cities nowadays, musical artisanship is so ill distributed, performers so ill paid,...
Page 2 - ... comprehends, and is moved: then his emotion communicates itself to those whom he directs, his inward fire warms them, his electric glow animates them, his force of impulse excites them; he throws around him the vital irradiations of musical art. If he be inert and frozen, on the contrary, he paralyses all about him, like those floating masses of the polar seas, the approach of which is perceived through the sudden cooling of the atmosphere. His task is a complicated one. He has not only to conduct,...
Page 2 - ... agreed at length to follow the slight indications of time which the concertmeister (first violin-player) gave them ; and not to attend to Beethoven's conducting-stick. Moreover, it should be observed, that conducting a symphony, an overture, or any other composition whose movements remain continuous, vary little, and contain few nice gradations, is child's play in comparison with conducting an opera, or like work, where there are recitatives, airs, and numerous orchestral designs preceded by...
Page 19 - Whence it follows that scarcely the half of them come in again at the right moment; while the rest still hold their instrument under their left arm, and look about them. Thus the point is greatly weakened, if not entirely missed. I invoke the attention and rigour of orchestral conductors to this insufferable habit. It is, however, so rooted that they will only ensure its extirpation by making a large number of violinists amenable for the fault of a single player; by inflicting a fine, for example,...
Page 1 - Of producing artists, the composer is almost the only one, in fact, who depends upon a multitude of intermediate agents between the public and himself; intermediate agents, either intelligent or stupid, devoted or hostile, active or inert, capable — from first to last — of contributing to the brilliancy of his work, or of disfiguring it, misrepresenting it, and even destroying it completely. Singers have often been accused of forming the most dangerous of these intermediate agents; but, in my...
Page 2 - ... transmitting to them his feeling is denied him, and thence power, empire, and guiding influence completely fail him. He is then no longer a conductor, a director, but a simple beater of the time — supposing he knows how to beat it, and divide it, regularly. The performers should feel that he feels, comprehends, and is moved: then his emotion communicates itself to those whom he directs, his inward fire warms them, his electric glow animates them, his force of impulse excites them; he throws...
Page 16 - ... performers the most perfect unity ever witnessed. With one or more electric metronomes, it seems no longer necessary to have recourse to this means. One might, in fact, thus easily conduct chorus-singers who turn their back towards the chief conductor; but attentive and intelligent sub-conductors are always preferable to a machine. They have not only to beat the time, like the metronomic staff, but they have also to speak to the groups around them, to call their attention to nice shades of execution,...
Page 17 - ... in order that the voices of the tenors and basses, proceeding from a more elevated point than those of the sopranos and contraltos, may come forth freely and be neither stifled nor intercepted. When the presence of the chorus-singers in front of the orchestra is not necessary, the conductor will take care to send them away; since this large number of human bodies injures the sonority of the instruments. A symphony, performed by an orchestra thus more or less stifled, loses much of its effect....

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