A Residence in Jutland, the Danish Isles, and Copenhagen, Volume 2

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J. Murray, 1860 - Denmark
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Page 45 - Swede, who, fixing his longing eyes on the beverage, exclaimed, ' I am thirsty ; give me to drink.' "Now the burgher of Flensborg was a kind man, and, though he suffered greatly himself, he replied at once — ' Thy need is greater than mine :' and, kneeling down by the side of the wounded soldier, he poured the liquor into his mouth. " But the treacherous Swede, taking advantage of the unarmed state of his benefactor, fired his pistol as he bent down, wounding him in the shoulder. " Then the burgher...
Page 168 - Thorvaldsen lies interred ; the pavement tesselated ; the ceilings blue and starry ; against the walls, which are dark and in good relief, are placed many of the sculptor's largest works. It is always pleasant on entering a strange house, of whose contents you feel profoundly ignorant, to stumble on an old acquaintance : it puts you in good humour, and carries back the mind far away to days gone by, and scenes half forgotten rise fresh to your memory. Such were my feelings when, on entering the corridor,...
Page 45 - Thy need is greater than mine," he knelt down by the fallen enemy, to pour the liquor into his mouth. His requital was a pistol-shot in the shoulder from the treacherous Swede. " Rascal," he cried, " I would have befriended you, and you would murder me in return ! Now will I punish you. I would have given you the whole bottle ; but now you shall have only half.
Page 85 - ... ornaments. I myself have seen, in the remote villages of the islands, ancient censers of the Valdemerian period preserved in the same vestry cupboard with the sacramental plate, and, on inquiring why they were still retained, have received as answer, "They have always been there.
Page 412 - Bothwell for having taken her away from her native country, and refusing to treat her as his married wife, although he by hand, word of mouth, and by letters had promised her so to do, which letters she caused to be read before him. And inasmuch as he had three wives living — first, herself ; then another in Scotland, of whom he had rid himself by purchase ; last of all, the Queen Mary — Mrs Anna was of opinion that he was not at all a person to be depended on ; he therefore promised her the...
Page 281 - You enter the interior court through a richly ornamented gateway, guarded by statues and overhung by a beautiful oriel window, enriched with the arms and ciphers of its founder. Opposite to you stands the chapel (the works of Rubens have long since disappeared) ; the fittings of the time of Christian IV. have been lately restored, not too carefully. It is curious to trace, as you can by the turret to the right of the clock, the gradual transition from the Gothic to the Renaissance. The whole of the...
Page 21 - English officer, whb had vowed to avenge the fate of this ill-used princess, whom he had accompanied on her voyage to Denmark.* The homesteads or farmhouses of Holstein are models of concentration : no turning out in bad weather to look after cows, sheep, or horses ; everything stands condensed under one building, with a large high-pitched roof, necessary to throw off the snow in winter season. They are very picturesque to look at, built of brick and timber in panels, the bricks arranged in pattern,...
Page 97 - Zealand under his yoke, with a proper feeling of gratitude towards the " alma mater " ships, and were laying waste the country. Absalon hastily armed his church vassals, with as many of the neighbouring peasantry as he could collect, and, making a sudden onset upon the enemy, drove them back to their ships with slaughter. No archbishop of Lund ever equalled Absalon fa grandeur, in whose favour his predecessor, worn out with age, abdicated ; but Absalon refused the honour. " Nolo Arehiepiscopari,"...
Page 223 - ... the end of the reign of King James, when he gave two thousand pounds to Sir Francis Crane to build therewith an house at Moreclark for that purpose. Here they only imitated old patterns, until they had procured one Francis Klein, a German, to be their designer. This Francis Klein was born at Eostock, but bred in the Court of the King of Denmark at Copenhagen. To improve his skill he travelled into Italy, and lived at Venice, and became first known to Sir Henry Wootton, who was the English Lieger...
Page 85 - ... inquiring why they •were still retained, have received as answer, "They have always been there." Frederic II. would allow of no dissent, no Calvinistic tendencies ; the Lutheran was the recognised religion of the land, and that people must hold to, or nothing. Christian IV., his son, though he was kind to and fought for the fortunes of our " Winter Queen," the daughter of his sister Anne, never forgave his nephew for breaking the crucifixes and images at Prague.

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