1794-1815

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J.B. Lippincott & Company, 1865 - United States
 

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Good book for fans of history or anyone who is doing a history project.

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Page 276 - It shall be lawful for all and singular the subjects of the Most Christian King, and the citizens, people and inhabitants of the said United States, to sail with their ships with all manner of liberty and security, no distinction being made who are the proprietors of the merchandizes laden thereon...
Page 9 - Curtain too well not to perceive the old trick of turning every contingency into a resource for accumulating force in the Government.
Page 342 - New principles too have been interpolated into the law of nations, founded neither in justice, nor the usage or acknowledgment of nations. According to these a belligerent takes to itself a commerce with its own enemy, which it denies to a neutral, on the ground of its aiding that enemy in the war.
Page 276 - It shall likewise be lawful for the citizens aforesaid to sail with the ships and merchandise before mentioned, and to trade with the same liberty and security from the places, ports, and havens of those who are enemies of both or either party, without any opposition or disturbance whatsoever, not only directly from the places of the enemy...
Page 351 - ... a decided superiority at sea. Such colonies are dependent for their existence, as colonies, on foreign supplies; if they cannot be supplied and defended, they must fall to the belligerent of course; and if the belligerent chooses to apply his means to such an object, what right has a third party, perfectly neutral, to step in and prevent the execution?
Page 390 - The seat of judicial. authority is, indeed, locally here, in the belligerent country, according to the known law and practice of nations ; but 'the law itself has no locality.
Page 287 - Neutral ships shall enjoy a free navigation even from port to port, and on the coasts of the belligerent powers.
Page 276 - ... all which shall be wholly reckoned among free goods ; as likewise all other merchandizes and things which are not comprehended and particularly mentioned in the foregoing enumeration of contraband goods ; so that they may be transported and carried in the freest manner by the subjects of both confederates, even to places belonging to an enemy, such towns or places being only excepted, as are at that time besieged, blocked up or invested.
Page 353 - It is an indubitable right of the belligerent to possess himself of such places, as of any other possession of his enemy. This is his common right; but he has the certain means of carrying such a right into effect if he has a decided superiority at sea. Such colonies are dependent for their existence, as colonies, on foreign supplies; if they cannot be supplied and defended, they must fall to the belligerent of course...
Page 352 - True it is. you have, by force of arms forced such places out of the exclusive possession of the enemy, but I will share the benefit of the conquest, and by sharing its benefits prevent its progress. You have in effect, and by lawful means, turned the enemy out of the possession which he had exclusively maintained against the whole world, and with whom we had never presumed to interfere; but we will interpose to prevent his absolute surrender, by the means of that very opening, which the prevalence...

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