The End of Blackness: Returning the Souls of Black Folk to Their Rightful Owners

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Dec 10, 2008 - Social Science - 320 pages
2 Reviews
Debra Dickerson pulls no punches in this electrifying manifesto. Outspoken journalist and author of the critically acclaimed memoir An American Story, she challenges black Americans to stop obsessing about racism and start focusing on problems they can fix. The way out of the ghetto, she asserts, is to take a good, hard look in the mirror. Get angry, Dickerson says, but use that anger to fuel excellence and civic participation rather than crime or drug addiction. Drawing richly on black history and thought, as well as her own hard-won wisdom, she urges blacks to let go of the past and claim their full freedom. It’s only by shaping their own future, she argues, that blacks will finally abolish the myth of white superiority.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

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THE END OF BLACKNESS: Returning the Souls of Black Folk to Their Rightful Owners

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

A full-bore assault on white racism on one hand and black orthodoxies on the other, one that finds the author well-prepared for the inevitable backlash.At which point, journalist Dickerson (An ... Read full review

The end of Blackness: returning the souls of Black folk to their rightful owners

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

In this controversial critique on race, Dickerson (An American Story) exposes racial myths and biases held by both blacks and whites today while critiquing the purposeful corruption of American history and the nonsense that passes for sociology. Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
3
PRO LOG
27
TAKING THE WORDS OUT OF BLACK MOUTIIS
51
Three
146
GONE NATIVE
248
Notes 159
259
Acknowledgments 281
280
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Debra J. Dickerson was educated at the University of Maryland, St. Mary's University, and Harvard Law School. She has been both a senior editor and a contributing editor at U.S. News & World Report, and her work has also appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, The New Republic, Slate, The Village Voice, and Essence. She lives in Albany, New York.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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