ReOrient: Global Economy in the Asian Age

Front Cover
University of California Press, 1998 - Political Science - 416 pages
4 Reviews
Andre Gunder Frank asks us to ReOrient our views away from Eurocentrism--to see the rise of the West as a mere blip in what was, and is again becoming, an Asia-centered world. In a bold challenge to received historiography and social theory he turns on its head the world according to Marx, Weber, and other theorists, including Polanyi, Rostow, Braudel, and Wallerstein. Frank explains the Rise of the West in world economic and demographic terms that relate it in a single historical sweep to the decline of the East around 1800. European states, he says, used the silver extracted from the American colonies to buy entry into an expanding Asian market that already flourished in the global economy. Resorting to import substitution and export promotion in the world market, they became Newly Industrializing Economies and tipped the global economic balance to the West. That is precisely what East Asia is doing today, Frank points out, to recover its traditional dominance. As a result, the "center" of the world economy is once again moving to the "Middle Kingdom" of China. Anyone interested in Asia, in world systems and world economic and social history, in international relations, and in comparative area studies, will have to take into account Frank's exciting reassessment of our global economic past and future. Andre Gunder Frank asks us to ReOrient our views away from Eurocentrism--to see the rise of the West as a mere blip in what was, and is again becoming, an Asia-centered world. In a bold challenge to received historiography and social theory he turns on its head the world according to Marx, Weber, and other theorists, including Polanyi, Rostow, Braudel, and Wallerstein. Frank explains the Rise of the West in world economic and demographic terms that relate it in a single historical sweep to the decline of the East around 1800. European states, he says, used the silver extracted from the American colonies to buy entry into an expanding Asian market that already flourished in the global economy. Resorting to import substitution and export promotion in the world market, they became Newly Industrializing Economies and tipped the global economic balance to the West. That is precisely what East Asia is doing today, Frank points out, to recover its traditional dominance. As a result, the "center" of the world economy is once again moving to the "Middle Kingdom" of China. Anyone interested in Asia, in world systems and world economic and social history, in international relations, and in comparative area studies, will have to take into account Frank's exciting reassessment of our global economic past and future.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

If we want to gain a more realistic understanding of "The Rise of the West" and other issues intimately related to it,Frank's book is the right place to begin.

Review: ReORIENT: Global Economy in the Asian Age

User Review  - Robert Davis - Goodreads

It will turn your notions of Western superiority on their head. Read full review

Contents

Introduction to Real World History vs Eurocentric Social Theory I
1
Globalism not Eurocentrism
8
Outline of a Global Economic Perspective
34
2
40
The Global Trade Carousel 14001800
52
India and the Indian Ocean
84
Southeast Asia
92
Japan
104
Science and Technology
185
World Technological Development
204
5
222
Simultaneity Is No Coincidence
228
6
258
the West Rise?
276
A Global Economic Demographic Explanation
297
Past Conclusions and Future Implications
318

Central Asia
117
Russia and the Baltics
123
3
130
the Winners Use Their Money?
151
Comparisons and Relations
165
Through the Global Looking Glass
339
Agency vs Structure
351
INDEX
389
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1998)

Andre Gunder Frank, of the University of Toronto, has published more than thirty books. Most recently he coedited, with Barry Gills, World System: Five Hundred Years or Five Thousand? (1996).

Bibliographic information