The Journal of the Joint Committee of Fifteen on Reconstruction: Introduction and the Journal of the Joint Committee on Reconstruction

Front Cover
Columbia University, 1914 - Reconstruction - 415 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 117 - No state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States, nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty or property, without due process of law, nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.
Page 296 - Resolved by the senate and house of representatives of the United States of America in congress assembled (two-thirds of both houses concurring,) That the following article be proposed to the legislatures of the several states as an amendment to the constitution of the United States...
Page 23 - We doubt very much whether any action of a State not directed by way of discrimination against the negroes as a class, or on account of their race, will ever be held to come within the purview of this provision.
Page 412 - That, until the people of said rebel States shall be by law admitted to representation in the Congress of the United States, any civil governments which may exist therein shall be deemed provisional only, and in all respects subject to the paramount authority of the United States at any time to abolish, modify, control, or supersede the same...
Page 218 - States, shall be the supreme law of the land ; and all judges in every State shall be bound thereby, anything in the Constitution and laws of any State to the contrary, notwithstanding.
Page 23 - ... no one can fail to be impressed with the one pervading purpose found in them all, lying at the foundation of each, and without which none of them would have been even suggested ; we mean the freedom of the slave race, the 'security and firm establishment of that freedom, and tho protection of the newly-made freeman and citizen from the oppressions of those who had formerly exercised unlimited dominion over him.
Page 50 - RESOLVED, By the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, two-thirds of both Houses concurring, that the following articles be proposed to the legislatures of the several States, as amendments to the Constitution of the United States...
Page 380 - Arkansas; and whereas it is necessary that peace and good order should be enforced in said States until loyal and republican State governments can be legally established...
Page 367 - ... that this war is not waged upon our part in any spirit of oppression nor for any purpose of conquest or subjugation, nor purpose of overthrowing or interfering with the rights or established institutions of those States, but to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution, and to preserve the Union with all the dignity, equality and rights of the several States unimpaired ; and that as soon as these objects are accomplished the war ought to cease.
Page 128 - That all persons put under military arrest by virtue of this act shall be tried without unnecessary delay, and no cruel or unusual punishment shall be inflicted, and no sentence of any military commission or tribunal hereby authorized, affecting the life or liberty of any person, shall be executed until it is approved by the officer in command of the district, and the laws and regulations...

Bibliographic information