The Dictionary of National Biography, Volume 13

Front Cover
Sir Sidney Lee
Oxford University Press, 1909 - Great Britain
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Page 641 for Munson

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Page 485 - BOTH ENGLISH AND LATIN, Compos'd at several times. Printed by his true Copies. The Songs were set in Musick by Mr. HENRY LAWES, Gentleman of the Kings Chappel, and one of His Majesties Private Musick. Printed and publish'd according to Order. Printed by RUTH RAWORTH for HUMPHREY MOSELEY, and are to be sold at the signe of the Princes Armes in Pauls Churchyard, 1645.
Page 472 - I was confirmed in this opinion, that he, who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem...
Page 273 - Comparative Discourse of our English Poets with the Greek, Latin, and Italian Poets...
Page 424 - Sharon Turner's History of the AngloSaxons, from the Earliest Period to the Norman Conquest.
Page 485 - The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates PROVING THAT IT IS LAWFUL, AND HATH BEEN HELD SO THROUGH ALL AGES, FOR ANY WHO HAVE THE POWER TO CALL TO ACCOUNT A TYRANT, OR WICKED KING, AND AFTER DUE CONVICTION TO DEPOSE AND PUT HIM TO DEATH, IF THE ORDINARY MAGISTRATE HAVE NEGLECTED OR DENIED TO DO IT.
Page 489 - Views in Egypt, from the original drawings in the possession of Sir Robert Ainslie, taken during his embassy to Constantinople by Luigi Mayer; engraved by and under the direction of Thomas Milton; with historical observations, and incidental illustrations of the manners and customs of the natives of that country.
Page 486 - The ready and easy way to establish a free Commonwealth, and the excellence thereof compared with the inconveniences and dangers of re-admitting Kingship in the realm.
Page 476 - That indisposition, unfitness, or contrariety of mind, arising from a cause in nature unchangeable, hindering, and ever likely to hinder, the main benefits of conjugal society, which are solace and peace ; is a greater reason of divorce than natural frigidity, especially if there be no children, and that there be mutual consent.
Page 348 - A Free Inquiry into the Miraculous Powers which are supposed to have subsisted in the Christian Church, from the earliest ages through several successive centuries...
Page 391 - I am thus one of the very few examples, in this country, of one who has, not thrown off religious belief, but never had it : I grew up in a negative state with regard to it.

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