The Works of Thomas Reid: With Account of His Life and Writings, Volume 1

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Samuel Etheridge, Jun'r., 1818 - Philosophy
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Page 184 - I may be permitted to change the metaphor) has no other root but the principles of Common Sense; it grows out of them, and draws its nourishment from them. Severed from this root, its honours wither, its sap is dried up, it dies and rots.
Page 33 - Tis evident, that all the sciences have a relation, greater or less, to human nature ; and that however wide any of them may seem to run from it, they still return back by one passage or another. Even Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, and Natural Religion, are in some measure dependent on the science of MAN ; since they lie under the cognizance of men, and are judged of by their powers and faculties.
Page 183 - Admired Philosophy ! daughter of light ! parent of wisdom and knowledge ! if thou art she, surely thou hast not yet arisen upon the human mind, nor blessed us with more of thy rays than are sufficient to shed a darkness visible...
Page 65 - ... were grains and fruits. We first observed the young animal get upon its feet and walk ; then it shook itself, and afterwards scratched its side with one of its feet : then we saw it smelling to every one of those things that were set in the room ; and when it had smelt to them all, it drank up the...
Page 65 - I found a brisk embryon, and having detached it from the matrix, and snatched it away before it saw its dam, I brought it into a room, where there were many vessels, some filled with wine, others with oil, some with honey, others with milk or some other liquor, and in others there were grains and fruit.
Page 442 - We have shown, on the contrary, that every operation of the senses, in its very nature, implies judgment or belief, as well as simple apprehension. Thus, when I feel the pain of the gout in my toe, I have not only a notion of pain, but a belief of its existence, and a belief of some disorder in my toe which occasions it...
Page 8 - ... the most violent opposition, but was exposed to personal danger. His unwearied attention, however, to the duties of his office ; the mildness and forbearance of his temper, and the active spirit of his humanity, soon overcame all these prejudices ; and, not many years afterwards, when he was called to a different situation, the same persons who had suffered themselves to be so far misled as to take a share in the outrages against him, followed him, on his departure, with their blessings and tears.
Page 32 - Credunt homines rationem suam verbis imperare ; sed fit etiam ut verba vim suam super rationem retorqueant.
Page 185 - The second proceeds upon the same principles, but carries them to their full length; and as the Bishop undid the whole material world, this author, upon the same grounds, undoes the world of spirits, and leaves nothing in nature but ideas and impressions, without any subject on which they may be impressed.
Page 83 - Sometimes hanging over a dreadful precipice, and just ready to drop down ; sometimes pursued for my life, and stopped by a wall, or by a sudden loss of all strength ; sometimes ready to be devoured by a wild beast. How long I was plagued with such dreams I do not now recollect.

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