The Histories of Polybius, Volume 2

Front Cover
Macmillan and Company, 1889 - Greece
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 529 - The day shall be when holy Troy shall fall And Priam, lord of spears, and Priam's folk." And on my asking him boldly (for I had been his tutor) what he meant by these words, he did not name Rome distinctly, but was evidently fearing for her, from this sight of the mutability of human affairs . . . Another still more remarkable saying of his I may record . . . When he had given the order for...
Page 242 - The Senate of Rome and Titus Quintus [Flamininus], proconsul and imperator, having conquered King Philip and the Macedonians in war, declare the following peoples free, without garrison, or tribute, in full enjoyment of the laws of their respective countries: namely, Corinthians, Phocians, Locrians, Euboeans, Achaeans of Phiotis, Magnesians, Thessalians, Perrhaebians.
Page 161 - At first he feigned not to be able to say what he wished for tears ; but after again and again wiping his eyes with his chlamys, he at length mastered his emotion, and taking the young king in his arms spoke as follows : ' Take this boy, whom his father on his deathbed placed in this lady's arms ' (pointing to his sister) 'and confided to your loyalty, men of Macedonia ! That lady's affection has but little influence in securing this child's safety : it is on you that that safety now depends ; his...
Page 453 - Fabius, it happened that Fabius left them to go to the Forum, and that Polybius went in another direction with Scipio. As they were walking along, in a quiet and subdued voice, and with the blood mounting to his...
Page 90 - For as a living creature is rendered wholly useless if deprived of its eyes, so if you take truth from history, what is left is but an idle unprofitable tale...
Page 22 - ... office of Hipparch, either, from being without any genius themselves for cavalry tactics, do not venture to enforce necessary orders upon others; or, because they are aiming at being elected Strategus, try all through their year of office to attach the young men to themselves and to secure their favor in the coming election; and accordingly never administer necessary reprimands, which are the salvation of the public interests, but hush up all transgressions, and, for the sake of gaining an insignificant...
Page 102 - ... policy or arrangement failed or succeeded. For a bare statement of an occurrence is interesting indeed, but not instructive; but when this is supplemented by a statement of cause, the study of history becomes fruitful. For it is by applying analogies •to our own circumstances that we get the means and basis for calculating the future ; and for learning from the past when to act with caution, and when with greater boldness, in the present.
Page 22 - Being then appointed Hipparch by the Achaean league at this time, and finding the squadrons in a state of utter demoralization and the men thoroughly dispirited, he did not only restore them to a better state than they were, but in a short time made them even superior to the enemy's cavalry by bringing them all to adopt habits of real training and genuine emulation. The fact is that most of those who hold this office of Hipparch, either, from being without any genius themselves for cavalry tactics,...
Page 453 - Of course you have the same opinion of me as I hear the rest of the city has. For I am considered by everybody, I hear, to be a mild, effete person, and far removed from the true Roman character and ways, because I don't care for pleading in the law...
Page 438 - ... was careful to keep on good terms with the Roman Senate, and he must have had powerful friends among the members of that body, or he would never have obtained the help of Rome in his quarrels with his brother. Polybius takes the view (xxxi. 18) that the Romans with profound policy availed themselves of the mistakes of others to augment and strengthen their own empire, under the guise of granting favours and benefiting those who committed the mistakes, and that they acted in this manner when they...

Bibliographic information