The Tuskegee Syphilis Study: The Real Story and Beyond

Front Cover
NewSouth Books, 1998 - History - 175 pages
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In 1932, the U.S. Public Health Service recruited 623 African American men from Macon County, Alabama, for a study of "the effects of untreated syphilis in the Negro male." For the next 40 years--even after the development of penicillin, the cure for syphilis--these men were denied medical care for this potentially fatal disease. The Tuskegee Syphilis Study was exposed in 1972, and in 1975 the government settled a lawsuit but stopped short of admitting wrongdoing. In 1997, President Bill Clinton welcomed five of the Study survivors to the White House and, on behalf of the nation, officially apologized for an experiment he described as wrongful and racist. In this book, the attorney for the men describes the background of the Study, the investigation and the lawsuit, the events leading up to the Presidential apology, and the ongoing efforts to see that out of this painful and tragic episode of American history comes lasting good.
 

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Down load unable to access and save to my computer
This e book was a foolish purchase on my behalf. I am unable to save to my computer or open in anything but through the website, therefor unable to print for college class to reference the hard copy. I am not happy at the moment.

Contents

Introduction
23
Origins of the Study
37
The Study Revealed
74
An Abrupt End to the Study
100
The Presidential Apology
114
The Legacy
133
Table of Contents
144
Appendix
158
Bibliography
171
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About the author (1998)

Fred D. Gray is one of the nation's leading civil rights attorneys. At age 24, he was the lawyer for Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Montgomery Bus Boycott, which began the modern Civil Rights Movement. His other cases and clients include the Freedom Riders, the Selma-to-Montgomery March, numerous school desegregation and voting rights lawsuits, and many others. He lives in Tuskegee, Alabama.

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