The Accordion Family: Boomerang Kids, Anxious Parents,and the Private Toll of Global Competition

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Beacon Press, Jan 17, 2012 - Social Science - 320 pages
Why are adults in their twenties and thirties boomeranging back to or never leaving their parents' homes in the world's wealthiest countries? Acclaimed sociologist Katherine Newman addresses this phenomenon in this timely and original book that uncovers fascinating links between globalization and the failure-to-launch trend. With over 300 interviews conducted in six countries, Newman concludes that nations with weak welfare states have the highest frequency of accordion families. She thoughtfully considers the positive and negative implications of these new relationships and suggests that as globalization reshapes the economic landscape it also continues to redefine our private lives.
 

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THE ACCORDION FAMILY: Boomerang Kids, Anxious Parents, and the Private Toll of Global Competition

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A look at the impact of globalization on young people finds intriguing differences in family relationships and living patterns in selected countries around the around.A sociologist who has written ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 2
CHAPTER 3
CHAPTER 4
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 7
CONCLUSION
A NOTE ON METHODS AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
NOTES
Index
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Katherine Newman is professor of sociology and James Knapp Dean of the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences at Johns Hopkins University.  Author of ten books on middle-class economic instability, urban poverty, and the sociology of inequality, Newman has taught at the University of California-Berkeley, Columbia, Harvard, and Princeton.

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