The Gift of Tongues: Women's Xenoglossia in the Later Middle Ages

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Penn State Press, Jan 1, 2010 - Religion - 232 pages
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Tales of xenoglossia&—the instantaneous ability to read, to write, to speak, or to understand a foreign language&—have long captivated audiences. Perhaps most popular in Christian religious literature, these stories celebrate the erasing of all linguistic differences and the creation of wider spiritual communities. The accounts of miraculous language acquisition that appeared in the Bible inspired similar accounts in the Middle Ages. Though medieval xenoglossic miracles have their origins in those biblical stories, the medieval narratives have more complex implications. In The Gift of Tongues, Christine Cooper-Rompato examines a wide range of sources to show that claims of miraculous language are much more important to medieval religious culture than previously recognized and are crucial to understanding late medieval English writers such as Geoffrey Chaucer and Margery Kempe.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Technology and the Fichtean
5
Representation and the Problemof the Third Term
30
3 Spirit and the Technology of the Letter
51
Affect Image and the Critique of Representational Consciousness
68
5 Subtle Matter and the Ground of Intersubjectivity
101
6 The Aesthetic of Influence
130
From Subjectivity to Being
157
From a Metaphysical to a Technological Imagination
180
Bibliography
198
Index
203
Back Cover
207
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Christine F. Cooper-Rompato is Assistant Professor of English at Utah State University.

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