Hindu-Christian Dialogue: Theological Soundings and Perspectives

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Rodopi, 2002 - Religion - 220 pages
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Dialogue is an integral part of the mission of the Christian church. The immensity of the ocean of Hindu doctrine and thought presents a significant obstacle to Christians who have been invited by the Roman Catholic Church to “scrutinize the divine Mystery” present in other religions. Many, fascinated by Hindu mysticism, confuse permanent Hindu beliefs with certain current Western religious movements. India's quest for the divine embodies multiple forms. Its millennia-old methods of meditation and varieties of asceticism often confuse those who are less inclined to experience of an inner spiritual nature. This book attempts to address some of these difficulties and questions. It is the author's belief that in the Hindu-Christian encounter the Christian believer will also rediscover the originality and newness of the Christian revelation, viz. the intervention of God in the history of salvation whereby God reveals his salvific love in Jesus Christ. Possessing expert knowledge of both Hinduism and Christianity, the author approaches the Hindu-Christian dialogue with sympathy and discernment.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTtON
7
CHAPTER
14
Points of Contact and Difficulties
23
CHAPTER 3
42
CHAPTER 4
54
Hindu and Christian
77
CHAPTER 8
94
CHAPTER 10
117
CHAPTER 11
143
A Christian Evaluation
160
Christianity and the System of Caste
171
CONCLUStON
189
GLOSSARY
202
INDEX OF NAMES
219
Copyright

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Page 14 - From the unreal lead me to the real; from darkness lead me to light; from death lead me to immortality
Page 9 - When Thou is spoken, the speaker has no thing for his object. For where there is a thing there is another thing. Every It is bounded by others; // exists only through being bounded by others. But when Thou is spoken, there is no thing. Thou has no bounds.
Page 21 - If we had attained the full vision of Truth, we would no longer be mere seekers, but would have become one with God, for Truth is God. But being only seekers we prosecute our quest, and are conscious of our imperfection. And if we are imperfect ourselves, religion as conceived by us must also be imperfect. We have not realized religion in its perfection, even as we have not realized God. Religion of our conception, being thus imperfect, is always subject to a process of evolution and re-interpretation.

About the author (2002)

Mariasusai Dhavamony is presently professor of theology and history of religions at the Gregorian University.

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