The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, Volume 38 (Google eBook)

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A. Constable, 1823
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Page 165 - Was this the face that launched a thousand ships, And burnt the topless towers of Ilium? — Sweet Helen, make me immortal with a kiss. — Her lips suck forth my soul : see, where it flies ! — Come, Helen, come, give me my soul again. Here will I dwell, for heaven is in these lips, And all is dross that is not Helena.
Page 165 - Oh, thou art fairer than the evening air Clad in, the beauty of a thousand stars...
Page 283 - The discretion of a judge is the law of tyrants: it is always unknown ; it is different in different men; it is casual, and depends upon constitution, temper, and passion. In the best, it is oftentimes caprice ; in the worst, it is every vice, folly, and passion to which human nature is liable.
Page 214 - Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take out and to keep out of the pockets of the people as Little as possible, over and above what it brings into the public treasury of the state.
Page 45 - I wish for nothing but to breathe, in this our island, in common with my fellow-subjects, the air of liberty. I have no ambition, unless it be the ambition to break your chain, and contemplate your glory. I never will be satisfied so long as the meanest cottager in Ireland has a link of the British chain clanking to his rags. He may be naked, — he shall not be in irons.
Page 62 - I was the parent and the founder, from the assassination of such men as the honorable gentleman and his unworthy associates. They are corrupt, — they are seditious, — and they, at this very moment, are in a conspiracy against their country ! I have returned to refute a libel...
Page 44 - Do not suffer the arrogance of England to imagine a surviving hope in the fears of Ireland ; do not send the people to their own resolves for liberty, passing by the tribunals of justice and the high court of parliament ; neither imagine that, by any formation of apology, you can palliate such a commission to your hearts, still less to your children, who will sting you...
Page 44 - I say, be bribed by an export of woollen, or an import of sugar, and permit that power which has thus withered the land to remain in your country and have existence in your pusillanimity. Do not suffer the...
Page 60 - I know the difficulty the honorable gentleman labored under when he attacked me, conscious that, on a comparative view of our characters, public and private, there is nothing he could say which would injure me. The public would not believe the charge. I despise the falsehood. If such a charge were made by an honest man, I would answer it in the manner I shall do before I sit down. But I shall first reply to it when not made by an honest man. The right honorable gentleman has called me "an unimpeached...
Page 165 - Ah, Faustus, Now hast thou but one bare hour to live, And then thou must be damned perpetually! Stand still, you ever-moving spheres of heaven, That time may cease, and midnight never come; Fair Nature's eye, rise, rise again and make Perpetual day; or let this hour be but A year, a month, a week, a natural day, That Faustus may repent and save his soul!

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