The Chinese Classics: Life and teachings of Confucius

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Trübner & Company, 1869 - Chinese literature
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Contents

I
1
II
12
III
22
IV
35
V
55
VI
116
VII
264
VIII
282

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Page 50 - ... if we say that we have no sin we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us.
Page 112 - Is there one word which may serve as a rule of practice for all one's life?' The Master said, 'Is not RECIPROCITY such a word? What you do not want done to yourself, do not do to others.
Page 192 - Chung-kung asked about perfect virtue. The Master said, "It is, when you go abroad, to behave to every one as if you were receiving a great guest ; to employ the people as if you were assisting at a great sacrifice ; not to do to others as you would not wish done to yourself ; to have no murmuring against you in the country, and none in the family.
Page 141 - When one cultivates to the utmost the principles of his nature, and exercises them on the principle of reciprocity, he is not far from the path. What you do not like, when done to yourself, do not do to others.
Page 267 - It cannot be, when the root is neglected, that what should spring from it will be well ordered. It never has been the case that what was of great importance has been slightly cared for, and, at the same time, that what was of slight importance has been greatly cared for.
Page 44 - While there are no stirrings of pleasure, anger, sorrow, or joy, the mind may be said to be in the state of Equilibrium. When those feelings have been stirred, and they act in their due degree, there ensues what may be called the state of Harmony. This Equilibrium is the great root from which grow all the human actings in the world, and this Harmony is the universal path which they all should pursue. Let the states of equilibrium and harmony exist in perfection, and a happy order will prevail throughout...
Page 316 - It is only he, possessed of all sagely qualities that can exist under heaven, who shows himself quick in apprehension, clear in discernment, of farreaching intelligence, and all-embracing knowledge, fitted to exercise rule ; magnanimous, generous, benign, and mild, fitted to exercise forbearance ; impulsive, energetic, firm, and enduring, fitted to maintain a firm hold ; self-adjusted, grave, never swerving from the Mean, and correct, fitted to command reverence ; accomplished, distinctive, concentrative,...
Page 141 - The Master's personal displays of his principles, and ordinary descriptions of them may be heard. His discourses about man's nature, and the way of Heaven, cannot be heard.
Page 125 - Learning without thought is labour lost ; thought without learning is perilous." XVI. The Master said, " The study of strange doctrines is injurious indeed ! " XVII. The Master said, " Yew, shall I teach you what knowledge is ? When you know a thing, to hold that you know it; and when you do not know a thing, to allow that you do not know it; — this is knowledge.
Page 200 - When affairs cannot be carried on to success, proprieties and music will not flourish. When proprieties and music do not flourish, punishments will not be properly awarded. When punishments are not properly awarded, the people do not know how to move hand or foot.

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