The True Story of Our National Calamity of Flood, Fire and Tornado ...: How the Whole Nation Joined in the Work of Relief

Front Cover
George F. Lasher Company & the John C. Winston Company, 1913 - Floods - 320 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
11
II
23
III
36
IV
55
V
74
VI
104
VII
110
VIII
138
XVIII
212
XIX
217
XX
220
XXI
225
XXII
228
XXIII
231
XXIV
239
XXV
243

IX
142
X
152
XI
163
XII
169
XIII
179
XIV
184
XV
191
XVI
197
XVII
204
XXVI
246
XXVII
254
XXVIII
263
XXIX
270
XXX
277
XXXI
285
XXXII
294
XXXIII
308
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 219 - Meat-packing began as early as 1871, but its first great advance followed the removal of the Union stock yards south of the city in 1884. South Omaha !<;;.) was rapidly built up around them. A Trans-Mississippi Exposition illustrating the progress and resources of the states west of the Mississippi was held at Omaha in 1898. It represented an investment of $2,000,000, and in spite of financial depression and wartime, 90% of their subscriptions were returned in dividends to the stockholders.
Page 139 - As early as 1812 Columbus was surveyed in rectangular squares; it was incorporated as a village in 1816, and chartered as a city in 1834. In general outline the city resembles a Maltese cross. It extends eight miles north and south, and seven miles east and west on its arms of expansion. Its longest streets, High and Broad. bisect the city north and south and east and west respectively. The uniform width of the former is 100 feet, and the breadth of the latter is 120 feet.
Page 51 - Jim! Jim!" suddenly shrieked the woman. "That's you, Jim, isn't it? You aren't dead, Jim. Say you aren't dead." Jim had been rescued from drowning. The return of James Cassidy was the one bit of joy in the awful gloom at the rescue headquarters, where gathered the victims of flood, fire and famine.
Page 143 - On the western side of the city from north to south runs Mill Creek, the remains of a once huge glacial stream, whose gently sloping valley half a mile or more wide, forms an easy path into the heart of the city, and was an indispensable factor in determining its position; highways, canals, and railroads come through it. and the city's growth has pushed much farther up this valley than in other directions. The railroad stock yards are on its eastern slope.
Page 34 - John Scott ascended a telegraph pole, and guided across the cable to places of safety men, women and children rescued from flooded houses. Scott had guided a dozen persons across the swaying bridges of wire when the explosion that started the fire occurred. The shock knocked Scott from the pole and he fell into a tree. "The last I saw of him he was trying to get into the windows of an abandoned house by way of one of the branches of the tree," said Frank Stevens, a fellow employee of Scott.
Page 85 - A survey of conditions in Dayton today shows that the sanitary situation is not so bad as was at first thought. Citizens have been warned to boil all drinking water and to bury refuse. City water is now flowing under twenty-pound pressure. Sewers in some sections are again in operation. The city expects to have others working tomorrow. "The city has been divided into six sanitary districts and tonight physicians who have been sworn in as district sanitary officers are being instructed as to their...
Page 154 - Covington are here and patrolling the city under the the direction of the city authorities. Last night, we regret to say, there was a beginning of looting and plundering in the south part of the city. Rigorous measures will be taken by the military and the police to repress and prevent such in the future. Piqua still is cut off from communication from the outside world. All the telegraph and telephone wires ore down.
Page 78 - George H. Wood, here in command of the military situation and he has cordially offered to co-operate in every way with our work of sanitation. "I think that the situation here is very satisfactory and that this community will find itself in a reassured position within a very short time and facing only then the problem of repair, restoration and rehabilitation. "I will go back to Cincinnati tonight to get into touch with matters left unfinished there and will go to Columbus at the earliest moment....
Page 78 - I will go back to Cincinnati tonight to get into touch with matters left unfinished there, and will go to Columbus at the earliest moment. "Governor Cox tells me that he thinks matters are in a satisfactory condition at Columbus ; that he has ample immediate supply of medicines and other necessaries, and that much of each is on the way. "The weather is fine and there does not seem to be any cause for apprehension of further floods in the vicinity of Dayton.
Page 291 - By 1875 these five great trunk lines, the New York Central, the Pennsylvania, the Erie, the Baltimore and Ohio, and the Grand Trunk, had connected their scattered units and established complete through systems.

Bibliographic information