Collected Sonnets, Old and New

Front Cover
C. Kegan Paul, 1880 - English poetry - 390 pages
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Contents

To the Lark
40
The Ocean
41
Love of Home
42
To
43
Vexation waits on passions changeful glow
44
To
45
A Summer Twilight
46
xil O be thou keen to guess when Flatterys near
47
No trace is left upon the vulgar mind
48
Autumn
49
The foot of Time so soundless never passd
50
Supposed to be written by One on whom the Death of an excellent Woman has forced the Convic
51
The same continued
52
xvin We cannot keep delightwe cannot tell
53
A Calm Evening
54
Collision of the Ayr and Comet Steamboats
55
On startling some Pigeons
56
Seest thou her blushes that like shadows sweet
57
A Perverse Lover
58
On a Picture of the Fates
59
Martial Ardour in Age
60
On seeing a Child blush on his first View of a
61
Death and its Antidote
64
O God impart Thy b essing to my cries
65
O it is sweet to weave aerial ties
66
Decadence of Greece 1830
67
Joy came from Heaven
71
Silkworms and Spiders
72
an Aspiration
74
The Cannon Fever
76
The Portrait Painter
78
Supposed to be written by any feebleminded man meditating SelfDestruction
79
To A H H
80
To
82
On a Genius of Lowly Estate
84
Prefatory
85
Great Localities An Aspiration
86
LI1I The same continued
88
Token Lights A Contrast
89
Great Localities Rome
90
The Moselle Boatman and his Daughter
91
The same continued
92
The Blush of Constantine at the Council of Nice
93
Constantines Amphitheatre at Treves
94
LX The Lions Skeleton
95
The ArrowKing 9
96
Cynotaphium
97
The same continued
98
The Vacant Cage
99
The same continued
100
Birdnesting
101
The Lachrymatory
102
An Incident in a Church
103
The same continued
104
On the Death of Two Little Children
105
Goddard and Lycidas
106
ixxii Hope beneath the Waters
107
LXXIH The BuoyBell
108
The Rainbow
109
The DeathSmile of Cowper III
111
Apprehension of Blindness
112
LXXV1II Loss and Restoration of Smell
113
On the Statue of Lord Byron
114
Mary Queen of Scots
116
The same continued
117
Queen Elizabeth
118
The Order of the Star of India
119
The same continued
120
A Thought for March i860
121
Autocratic Policy of the Federal Americans
122
Possible Results of the Friends Mission to St Petersburg
123
The same continued
124
The Great Exhibition of 1862
125
The same continued
126
Hebron
127
The same continued
128
The same continued
129
The Telegraph Cable to India
130
The SouthForeland Electric Light
131
Greatness of England
132
The Windbound Mission
133
The ThawWind
134
An April Day
135
The Charming of the East Wind 3
136
Fulvia 3
138
The same continued
139
cxxxv1 Gethsemane
171
The young Neologist at Bethlehem
181
How theHigher Criticismblesses the Bible
182
My First and Last Strophe
183
The GoldCrested Wren
184
The Holy Emerald
185
St Augustine and Monica
186
_CLII Nehemiahs Night Ride
187
Salome
188
The same continued
189
On a Picture of Armida and Rinaldo with the DecoyNymph
198
Art and Faith
199
Lucy
200
Marya Reminiscence
201
The same continued
202
Morning Sorrows
203
Minnie and her Dove
204
Eustace and Edith
205
Makebelieve Hunting
206
The SchoolBoys Dream on the Night before the Holidays
207
The Rogues Nightmare
208
Little Phcebe
209
Alice Wade versus Smallpox
210
Ellen
211
Annie and Ambrose
212
Going Home
213
Jealousy
214
The HalfRainbow
215
The PartingGate
216
Hero and Leander
217
Drowned in the Tropics
218
The SeaFairies Answer
219
Vienna and In Memoriam
220
ToaLittleChildwhoaskedforaLaurelCrown
221
A Recantation
222
Little Samuel
223
clxxxix A Brilliant Day
224
The Starling
225
No Nightingales or Compensation
226
cxcu The WoodRose
227
cxcni The HomeField Evening
228
Maggies Star
229
A Summer Night in the Beehive
230
The BeeWisp
231
cxcvn The Flys Lecture
232
The Rookery
233
On a Vase of Goldfish
234
The Plea of the Shot Swallow
235
The Last Sweep of the Scythe
236
ccu Harvesthome
237
ccin The Storma Harvest Memory
238
The First Week in October
239
From Harvest to January
240
Last Years Harvest
241
ccvil The Steam ThreshingMachine
242
The same continued
243
November Sunshine and the HouseFlies
244
The Diunkards last Market
245
The late Pastor of Woldsby Ebriorum
246
ccxii On the Eclipse of the Moon of October 1865
247
ccxih On an Annular Eclipse of the Sun in a Storm
248
The Moon and Sin an Illustration
249
Orion
250
Fanaticism a NightScene in the OpenAir
251
ccxvil Missing the Meteors 1866
252
ccxvm A Lookout for Thirty Years
253
The Moorland Tree in the Garden
254
In and out of the PineWood
255
Silent Praise
256
A Forest Sunset
257
ccxxm Written at the WoodSale of Messrs Blank and Co nonresident Proprietors
258
CCXXJV The Needles Lighthouse from Keyhaven Hampshire
259
SONNETS PUBLISHED IN 1873 AND DEDI
269
The old Hillsman and his Truck
298
Welsh Lucy
299
The little Heir of Shame
300
To a RedWheat Field 33
303
To a Scarecrow or Malkin left long after
304
The Willow 35
305
The old FoxHunter
306
To the GossamerLight
307
ccLxxm On finding a small Fly crushed in a Book
308
The Eagle and the Sonnet 39
309
Gout and Wings
310
Podager begs Pardon of Birds Bees and
311
A Colony of Nightingales
312
The Sparrow and the DewDrop
313
To a Cuckoo in a Highway Hedge
314
The Swan and the Peacock
315
Our new Church Clock
318
Twelve oclock at Noon
319
The Afternote of the Hour
320
After the SchoolFeast
321
The Murder of Bishop Patteson
322
The Pastors Prayer
323
To the Holy Virgin
324
The PalmWillow
325
On some HummingBirds in a Glass Case
327
SONNETS NOW FIRST PUBLISHED EXCEPT FOUR OR FIVE WHICH HA VE APPEARED IN MAGAZINES ccxcm Localities of Burns
329
To a starved Hare in the Garden in Winter
330
On the Secularists Notion of making our Churches into Museums and Exhibitions
331
The Air Register
332
cccxxvu Nightingales in Lincolnshire
363
cccxxxni Two Sorts of Emigrants
369
The Altar
381

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Page 31 - I, once gone, to all the world must die : The earth can yield me but a common grave. When you entombed in men's eyes shall lie. Your monument shall be my gentle verse, Which eyes not yet created shall o'er-read ; And tongues to be, your being shall rehearse, When all the breathers of this world are dead ; You still shall live (such virtue hath my pen) Where breath most breathes, — even in the mouths of men.
Page 2 - Why art thou silent! Is thy love a plant Of such weak fibre that the treacherous air Of absence withers what was once so fair ? Is there no debt to pay, no boon to grant ? Yet have my thoughts for thee been vigilant, Bound to thy service with unceasing care— The mind's least generous wish a mendicant For nought but what thy happiness could spare. Speak !—though this soft warm heart, once free to hold A thousand tender pleasures, thine and mine, Be left more desolate...
Page 108 - O friend of man! sore-vexed by Ocean's power, The changing tides wash o'er thee day by day; Thy trembling mouth is filled with bitter spray, Yet still thou ringest on from hour to hour; High is thy mission, though thy lot is wild — To be in danger's realm a guardian sound; In seamen's dreams a pleasant part to bear, And earn their blessing as the year goes round; And strike the key-note of each grateful prayer, Breathed in their distant homes by wife or child!
Page 41 - For ever changes with his restless tide; Flung shoreward now, to be regathered soon With kingly pauses of reluctant pride, And semblance of return. Anon from home He issues forth again, high ridged and free, The seething hiss of his tumultuous foam Like armies whispering where great echoes be!
Page 149 - Thanks be to heaven,' in happy mood I said, ' What sweeter aid my matins could befall Than this fair glory from the East hath made ? What holy sleights hath God, the Lord of all, To bid us feel and see ! we are not free To say we see not, for the glory comes Nightly and daily, like the flowing sea ; His lustre pierceth through the midnight glooms And, at prime hour, behold ! He follows me With golden shadows to my secret rooms !
Page 149 - As on my bed at dawn I mused and prayed, I saw my lattice prankt upon the wall, The flaunting leaves and flitting birds withal A sunny phantom interlaced with shade; Thanks be to heaven', in happy mood I said, 'What sweeter aid my matins could befall Than this fair glory from the East hath made? What holy sleights hath God, the Lord of all, To bid us feel and see! we are not free To say we see not, for the glory comes Nightly and daily, like the flowing sea; His lustre pierceth through the midnight...
Page 364 - IT was her first sweet child, her heart's delight : And, though we all foresaw his early doom, We kept the fearful secret out of sight ; We saw the canker, but she kiss'd the bloom. And yet it might not be : we could not brook To vex her happy heart with vague alarms, To blanch with fear her fond intrepid look, Or send a thrill through those encircling arms. She...
Page 16 - ... oft I watch thee from my garden-chair ! And, failing that, I search the lawns and bowers, To find thee floating o'er the fruits and flowers, And doing thy sweet work in silence there : Thou art the poet's darling, ever sought In the fair garden or the breezy mead ; The wind dismounts thee not ; thy buoyant thread Is as the sonnet, poising one bright thought, That moves but does not vanish ! borne along Like light, — a golden drift through all the song...
Page 2 - ... service with unceasing care, The mind's least generous wish a mendicant For nought but what thy happiness could spare. Speak — though this soft warm heart, once free to hold A thousand tender pleasures, thine and mine, Be left more desolate, more dreary cold Than a forsaken bird's-nest filled with snow 'Mid its own bush of leafless eglantine — Speak, that my torturing doubts their end may know ! TO BR HAYDON, ON SEEING HIS PICTURE OF NAPOLEON BUONAPARTE ON THE ISLAND OF ST.
Page 342 - One day we gave the child a colored sphere Of the wide Earth, that she might mark and know, By tint and outline, all its sea and land. She patted all the world; old Empires peeped Between her baby fingers; her soft hand Was welcome at all frontiers. How she leaped, And laughed and prattled in her world-wide bliss! But when we...

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