The Phantom Army: Being the Story of a Man and a Mystery

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C. Arthur Pearson, 1898 - English fiction - 357 pages
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Page 361 - ... THE KEEPERS OF THE PEOPLE. By EDGAR JEPSON, Author of " Sybil Falcon," " The Passion for Romance." THE SHROUDED FACE. By OWEN RHOSCOMYL, Author of "Battlement and Tower, "The Jewel of Ynys Galon." A MAORI MAID. By HB VOGEL. THE MASTER-KEY. By FLORENCE WARDEN, Author of " The House on the Marsh." THE AMERICAN EMPEROR. By Louis TRACY, Author of
Page 128 - ... from the foot-plate ; women's voices in pitiful entreaty were joined to the uproar ; black shapes swarmed over the lines ; the crack of pistol shots was heard above the terror of the night. Out of the very darkness the blow had come. The silent earth seemed to have opened that the ghostly figures might come forth. A scene to stir the heart, indeed, yet one not lacking its comedy or its moments of human nature.
Page 149 - I should put my pen to such a muddle. They will be instructions a child could understand. And you are a child, mon ami — you have the heart of a lion, the mind of a boy. If you did not know something about cavalry, we should despair for you.
Page 111 - He rides with Ximeno." " I shall go to meet him. We will keep our secrets, Giralda, and they will be a bond between us." " If you are my friend, they will never pass your lips," she cried quickly. " God guard you and her you love.
Page 150 - Walking there, in the silence of that garden, he beheld the conquered kingdoms lying before him in some great valley of his visions ; kings were suppliant and prostrate before him. He sat high above the multitudes in some mighty cathedral of the earth, and the homage of the world was his tribute. " Give me a hundred thousand such as you," he exclaimed at last, " and I will write a page in history which all eternity shall not blot out.
Page 157 - She shook her head. " He was passing down the stairs, and I was with my friends. Why do you ask me ? " " Because the Spanish papers said that he was in Madrid at the beginning of this week. If they were right, there would be nothing wonderful in your seeing him in London the day before yesterday. And yet I know that they are wrong. I have lived with this man for days together. Save for a few hours, he has never been out of my sight. He could not be in the mountains and in the city on the same day.
Page 150 - Captain," he said, changing his subject with his habitual brevity, " you will set out at midnight with a guide who will conduct you to Saint Girons. From that place, the world is before you as you choose. Go where you will until the month is up. If you carry with you any memory of Spain, let it be the memory of a man who knows how to blame and how to praise.
Page 109 - That is why the master is great in Arragon to-day ; great, because of Philip who sent a prince to us ; great, because of his own courage and love and power to win the hearts of men. For that the Count of Gavarnie will betray him.
Page 200 - Thdrese — nothing but the barracks, and the bugle, and the life I hate. Do you not forgive me for being sad to-night ? " She raised her pretty face to his and kissed his lips ; but almost in the act a cry escaped her, and she sprang to her feet. For a man, who wore a kepis and a loose cloak, and carried a rifle in his hand, stood at the door of the summer-house, watching them with obvious amusement. " Restez, restez, monsieur et mademoiselle...
Page 213 - Arragon to those wooded hills whereon her kinsmen had shed their blood that Spain might be free. She could remember in the silence of that Moorish house, where every beam told its tale of the ages of Spain's glory, that her country might yet be free again, and that she might take her part in a work so glorious. This love of fatherland, this ambition for it, had been the love and the ambition of her life. At one time she had thought it might be an unexacting love, demanding nothing which she could...

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