The Gates of Life

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Cupples & Leon, 1908 - 332 pages
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Contents

I
13
II
22
III
28
IV
35
V
44
VI
55
VII
64
VIII
76
XX
186
XXI
194
XXII
206
XXIV
215
XXV
224
XXVI
233
XXVII
241
XXVIII
247

IX
90
X
97
XI
108
XII
117
XIII
125
XIV
135
XV
143
XVI
154
XVII
163
XVIII
170
XIX
177
XXIX
253
XXX
262
XXXI
267
XXXII
277
XXXIII
286
XXXIV
296
XXXV
300
XXXVI
313
XXXVII
322
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Page 14 - ... warning and remonstrance after she had once tried to caution him against too fond a hope. She saw how bitterly he would be disappointed in case it should prove to be a girl. He was, however, so fixed on the point that she determined to say no more. After all, it might be a boy; the chances were equal. The Squire would not listen to any one else at all; so as the time went on his idea was more firmly fixed than ever. His arrangements were made on the base that he would have a son. The name was...
Page 334 - When a gifted and beautiful actress, who at the same time Is a secret service agent for the British government, captivates Parisian society with her histrionic powers and incidentally breaks many hearts and gets into innumerable tragic situations, the narrative...
Page 335 - Graham of Claverhouse By Ian Maclaren Fhe Last Great Novel of this Famous Author Illustrated in Colors by Frank T. Merrill 1 vol. 12 mo. cloth, gilt "GRAHAM OF CLAVERHOUSE" is a splendid novel of love, intrigue, and adventure. Through every line breathes the spirit of vibrant human nature and flashing local color. It is the historical romance of the century, instinct with poetic feeling and impelling dramatic charm. Caleb Conover, Railroader By Albert Payson Terhune 1 vol. 12 mo. cloth, gilt Illustrated...
Page 46 - Necessary!' the old lady's figure grew rigid as she sat up, and her voice was loud and high. 'Necessary for a young lady to go to a court house. To hear low people speaking of low crimes. To listen to cases of the most shocking kind; cases of low immorality; cases of a kind, of a nature of aa-class that you are not supposed to know anything about. ..." That is just it, Auntie. I am so ignorant that I feel I should know more of the lives of those very...
Page 20 - ... as straight as a lance... (Stoker, [1905] 2001, p.6). Finally, what with her name and body gendered masculine, Stephen proves her father's son: [Squire Norman] never, not then nor afterwards, quite lost the old belief that Stephen was indeed a son.... This belief tinged all his after-life and molded his policy with regard to his girl's upbringing. If she was to be indeed his son as well as his daughter, she must from the first be accustomed to boyish as well as girlish ways (Stoker, [1905] 2001,...
Page 334 - ... who at the same time is a secret service agent for the British government, captivates Parisian society with her histrionic powers and incidentally breaks many hearts and gets into innumerable tragic situations, the narrative of her adventures could not possibly be dull. When it is told by CN & AM ^Williamson, those past-masters in the art of fiction, in such a dramatic book as 'The Powers and Maxine' every page throbs with interest.
Page 112 - He had brought it on himself; it was the nemesis of that reality he had rejected all his life. He could not remember a time when he had not gloried in escaping from it by every means in his power.
Page 53 - It is bad women who seem to know men best, and to be able to influence them most," a character argues in The Man. "They can turn and twist and mold them as they choose. And they never hesitate to speak their own wishes; to ask for what they want. There are no tragedies, of the negative kind, in their lives. Why should good women leave power to such as they? Why should good women's lives be wrecked for a convention?
Page 264 - City was teeming with. life and commerce, when banks and police and soldiers made life and property comparatively safe, he began to be restless again. This was not the life to which he had set himself. He had gone into the wilderness to be away from cities and from men; and here a city had sprung up around him and men claimed him as their chief.
Page 78 - Leonard was lying back in his chair fanning himself with his wide-brimmed straw hat, with outstretched legs wide apart and resting on the back of his heels. He replied with grudging condescension: " Yes, it's cool enough after the hot tramp over the fields and through the wood. It's not so good as the house, though, in one way : a man can't get a drink here. I say, Stephen, it wouldn't be half bad if there were a shanty put up here.

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