Memoirs by James Burns, bailie of the city of Glasgow, 1644-1661. [Followed by] The ... battel of York [and] The diary of Robert Douglas when with the Scotish army in England, M.DC.XL.IV.

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1832
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Page vi - Presbyterian and the young licentiate who was intending to conform. Burnet however draws the portrait of Douglas very well, though with a somewhat grudging pen. " He had "something," he says, "very great in his countenance. His " looks showed both much wisdom and great thoughtfulness " but withal a vast pride. He was generally very silent. I "confess I never admired anything he said.. ..He was a man " of great personal courage, which...
Page vi - ... suppressed in all the early editions, and has only been restored in the recent Oxford one : — •" The two eminentest of them (the Covenanting clergy) were Mr. Douglas and Mr. Hutchesone. The former was a bastard of a bastard; but it is believed his father was Mary Queen of Scotland's son, for he was born soon after she was conveyed out of the Castle of Lochleven, and was educated with great care by a gentleman that helped her away...
Page ix - Gustava'a engagements, he was standing at some distance upon a rising ground ; and, quhen both wings were engaged, he observed some mismanagement in the left wing that was likely to prove fatal, and he either went or sent, and acquainted the commanding officer, and it was prevented and the day gained. " When Mr. Sharp was beginning to appear in his own colours, and his villany beginning to appear a little, for he went up to court, and was consecrate, he happened to be with Mr. Douglasse, and in conversation...
Page viii - Adolphus' army, and was in great reputation with him. He was very unwilling to part with Mr. Douglasse, and quhen he would needs leave the army, Gustavus said to him that he scarce ever knew a person of his qualifications for wisdom, (and) said he (Mr. D.) might be a counsellor to any Prince in Europe; for prudence and knowledge, he might be Moderator to a General Council ; and even for military skill, said he, I could very far trust my army to his conduct.
Page ix - Douglasse brother ; he checked him and said, ' Brother, noe more brother James, if my conscience had been of the make of yours, I could have been Bishop of Sanct Andrews sooner than A you.
Page 5 - Battel at York, 1644. — The Diary of Mr Robert Douglas when with the Scotish Army in England, 1644. — Some Remarkable Passages of the Lord's Providence towards me, JOHN SPREUL, Town-Clerk of Glasgow, in the bygane course...
Page 43 - Buccleuche's, but they carried themselves not so as I could have wished, neither could I prevail with them ; for these that fled, never came to charge with the enemy, but were so possesst wfth a panatick fear, that they ran for an example to others, and no enemie following them...
Page ix - Adolphus, who had so high an opinion of him, that he said, "that Mr. Douglas might have been counsellor to any prince in Europe ; for prudence and knowledge he might be moderator to a General Assembly ; and for military skill, I would very freely trust my army to his conduct.
Page xi - ... father was very much trusted by King Charles the Second, and was very much engaged in the King's interest, and had many private conferences with Monk when in Scotland, and encouraged him very much to appear for his restoration, and pressed him to go to England. When Lambert appeared, and came down with so strong an army, Monk lagged, and retired a little ; that a meeting of noblemen and others sent Mr. Douglas from Edinburgh to meet Monk when returning back from the Border ; that Mr. Douglas...
Page 64 - ... with a number of Scots officers. God used me as ane instrument to move him to come back againe ; for I was gathering men a mile from the place, and having some there, he drew that way, and having a purpose to goe away...

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