The History of England: From the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Death of George the Third, Volume 16

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T. Tegg, 1828 - Great Britain
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Page 55 - Abraham, which rise abruptly with a steep ascent from the banks of the river; that they might take possession of the ground on the back of the city, where it was but indifferently fortified : the dangers and difficulties attending the execution of this design were so peculiarly discouraging, that one would imagine it could not have been embraced but by a spirit of enterprise that bordered on desperation : the stream was rapid, the shore shelving, the bank of the river lined with sentinels, the landing-place...
Page 72 - Poleagera for me, I will not do it ; and I renounce (as I informed you a month ago I would do) meddling directly or indirectly with any thing whatever that may have relation to your administration, whether civil or military. For I had rather go and command the...
Page 180 - A committee having been appointed to inquire into the original standards of weights and measures in the kingdom of England, to consider the laws relating thereto, and to report their observations thereupon, together with their opinion of the most effectual means for...
Page 328 - The genius of Cervantes was transfused into the novels of Fielding, who painted the characters, and ridiculed the follies of life, with equal strength, humour, and propriety.
Page 328 - The exhibitions of the stage were improved to the most exquisite entertainment by the talents and management of Garrick, who greatly surpassed all his predecessors of this and perhaps every other nation, in his genius for acting ; in the sweetness and variety of his tones, the irresistible magic of his eye, the fire and vivacity of his action, the elegance of attitude, and the whole pathos of expression.
Page 114 - When he abandoned the field of battle, he despatched another billet to the queen, couched in these terms : — ' remove from Berlin with the royal family : let the archives be carried to Potsdam : the town may make conditions with the enemy.
Page 53 - Montmorenci, and the despair of finding such an occasion, excited an internal agitation, which visibly affected his external frame, and disordered his whole constitution, which was naturally delicate and tender. Among those who shared his confidence, he was often seen to sigh ; he was often heard to complain ; and even in the transports of his chagrin declare, that he would never return without success, to be exposed, as other unfortunate commanders had been, to the censure and reproach of an ignorant...
Page 58 - General Wolfe, perceiving the enemy crossing the river St. Charles, began to form his own line, which consisted of six battalions, and the Louisbourg grenadiers ; the right commanded by brigadier Monckton, and the left by brigadier Murray : to the rear of the left colonel Howe was posted with his light infantry, just returned from a four gun batter)', which they had taken without opposition.
Page 200 - The court, on due consideration of the whole matter before them, is of opinion that lord George Sackville is guilty of having disobeyed the orders of prince Ferdinand of Brunswick, whom he was by his commission and instructions directed to obey as commander in chief, according to the rules of war...
Page 329 - The laudable aim of enlisting the passions on the side of virtue was successfully pursued by Richardson, in his Pamela, Clarissa, and Grandison ; a species of writing equally new and extraordinary, where, mingled with much superfluity, we find a sublime system of ethics, an amazing knowledge and command of human nature.

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