Trafficking in Drug Users: Professional Exchange Networks in the Control of Deviance

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Cambridge University Press, 1983 - Self-Help - 227 pages
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Control of illegal drug use and abuse requires an elaborate network of organizations and professions: medical, legal, political, educational, and welfare. This book, first published in 1984, explores the way in which these diverse sectors coordinate the control of deviance in a complex society and how they respond to a sudden widespread increase in deviance spanning many institutional and professional domains. The latter of these concerns, James Beniger argues, affords us a unique insight into the more general question of societal control. He takes as an example of this phenomenon the dramatic appearance of the 'drug problem' in America in the Vietnam war era of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Exploiting this as an approximation of an experimentally induced disruption of society, Professor Beniger examines its impact on the interorganizational and professional networks that together constitute a system for the control of a social deviance.
 

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Contents

social change versus
7
toward a synthesis
31
Stratification in information and referral exchange
56
Exchange relationships in socialcontrol systems
93
boundary maintenance and hierarchical
139
the control system in context
158
Appendix A The data set
175
Appendix B Subgroup sampling and estimateddensity spaces
183
Notes
194
Bibliography
205
Name index
215
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