The History of Dartmouth College

Front Cover
Houghton, Osgood, 1878 - 474 pages
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The History of Dartmouth College by Baxter Perry Smith, first published in 1878, is a rare manuscript, the original residing in one of the great libraries of the world. This book is a reproduction of that original, which has been scanned and cleaned by state-of-the-art publishing tools for better readability and enhanced appreciation.

Restoration Editors' mission is to bring long out of print manuscripts back to life. Some smudges, annotations or unclear text may still exist, due to permanent damage to the original work. We believe the literary significance of the text justifies offering this reproduction, allowing a new generation to appreciate it.

 

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Page 371 - Fourth. An annual report shall be made regarding the progress of each college, recording any improvements and experiments made, with their cost and results, and such other matters, including State industrial and economical statistics, as may be supposed useful...
Page 459 - An Act for the further security of His Majesty's person and Government, and the succession of the Crown in the Heirs of the late Princess Sophia, being Protestants, and for extinguishing the hopes of the pretended Prince of Wales, and his open and secret abettors...
Page 457 - And we do further, of our special grace, certain knowledge and mere motion, for us, our heirs and successors, grant...
Page 295 - The law of the Lord is perfect, converting the soul : the testimony of the Lord is sure, making wise the simple. The statutes of the Lord are right, rejoicing the heart : the commandment of the Lord is pure, enlightening the eyes.
Page 196 - certain it is" — to continue the same great thinker's comment on the Friars — " that if these schoolmen to their great thirst of truth and unwearied travel of wit had joined variety of reading and contemplation, they had proved excellent lights to the great advancement of all learning and knowledge.
Page 379 - I thought not only agreeable, but enchanting, and that he seemed to me to be one of the best of men; a sentiment in which both their Majesties heartily joined. ' They say that Lord Dartmouth is an enthusiast,' said the King, ' but surely he says nothing on the subject of religion, but what every Christian may, and ought to say.
Page 456 - Some were probably added by the crown, with the approbation of Dr. Wheelock. Among these is the doctor himself. If any others were appointed...
Page 99 - The idea that institutions established for the use of the nation cannot be touched or modified, even to make them answer their end, because of rights gratuitously supposed in those employed to manage them in the trust for the public, may perhaps be a salutary provision against the abuses of a monarch, but is most absurd against the nation itself.
Page 252 - Refrain from these men, and let them alone: for if this counsel or this work be of men, it will come to nought: But if it be of God, ye cannot overthrow it; lest haply ye be found even to fight against God.
Page 459 - Wheelock, Doctor in Divinity, the founder of said college, to be president of said Dartmouth College, and to have the immediate care of the education and government of such students...

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