John Dalton and the Rise of Modern Chemistry

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Macmillan, 1895 - Chemistry - 216 pages
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Page 129 - Now, by the help of these principles, all material things seem to have been composed of the hard and solid particles above mentioned — variously associated, in the first creation, by the counsel of an intelligent agent.
Page 129 - a few points. . . . God is able to create particles of matter of several sizes and figures, and in several proportions to the space they occupy, and perhaps of different densities and forces. ... At least, I see nothing of contradiction in all this. . . . Now, by the help of these principles, all material things seem to have been composed of the hard and solid particles above
Page 150 - water were to be magnified to the size of the earth, the molecules of water would be larger than small shots, but smaller than cricket balls. How, then, did Dalton ascertain that the atoms of the different elements, being inconceivably minute, are not of the same weight, but that to each a definite number
Page 78 - call different shades of yellow. The difference between the green part and the blue part is very striking to my eye : they seem to be strongly contrasted. That between the blue and purple is much less so. The purple appears to be blue much darkened and condensed. In viewing the flame of a
Page 107 - inquiry into the relative weights of the ultimate particles of bodies is a subject, as far as I know, entirely new ; I have lately been prosecuting this inquiry with remarkable success. The principle cannot be entered upon in this paper ; but I shall
Page 204 - society had there not been superadded to them a beautiful moral simplicity and singleness of heart which made him go on steadily in the way he saw before him, without turning to the right hand or the left, and taught him to do homage to no authority before that of truth.
Page 31 - To one person more particularly I am peculiarly indebted, not only in this respect, but in many others ; indeed, if there be anything new and of importance to science contained in this work, it is owing, in great part, to my having had the advantage of his instruction and example in philosophical investigation.
Page 148 - explains the symbolic language which he uses : — " From the novelty as well as importance of the ideas suggested in this chapter it is deemed expedient to give plates exhibiting the mode of combination in some of the more simple cases. A specimen of these accompanies
Page 148 - Writing to Graham so late as 1837, he says : — " Berzelius's symbols are horrifying : a young student in chemistry might as soon learn Hebrew as make himself acquainted with them. They appear like a chaos of atoms . . . and to equally perplex the adepts of science, to discourage the learner, as well as to cloud the beauty and simplicity of the Atomic Theory.
Page 129 - motions of these permanent particles, compound bodies being apt to break, not in the midst of solid particles, but where those particles are laid together and only touch at a few points. . . . God is able to create particles of

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