Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Sep 10, 2002 - Computers - 288 pages
126 Reviews
In the tradition of Being Digital and The Tipping Point, Steven Johnson, acclaimed as a "cultural critic with a poet's heart" (The Village Voice), takes readers on an eye-opening journey through emergence theory and its applications.

A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK
A VOICE LITERARY SUPPLEMENT TOP 25 FAVORITE BOOKS OF THE YEAR
AN ESQUIRE MAGAZINE BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR

Explaining why the whole is sometimes smarter than the sum of its parts, Johnson presents surprising examples of feedback, self-organization, and adaptive learning. How does a lively neighborhood evolve out of a disconnected group of shopkeepers, bartenders, and real estate developers? How does a media event take on a life of its own? How will new software programs create an intelligent World Wide Web?

In the coming years, the power of self-organization -- coupled with the connective technology of the Internet -- will usher in a revolution every bit as significant as the introduction of electricity. Provocative and engaging, Emergence puts you on the front lines of this exciting upheaval in science and thought.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
32
4 stars
42
3 stars
38
2 stars
11
1 star
3

Excellent introduction to the science of networks. - Goodreads
A little bit out of date, but a good overview. - Goodreads
The book was interesting and easy to read. - Goodreads
a GREAT introduction to self-organizing systems. - Goodreads
The prose is boring, the content is awesome. - Goodreads

Review: Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software

User Review  - EggSalad - Goodreads

When I picked this up, I did not realize it was 14 years old. It was a bit jarring, but interesting, to see how the author discussed the internet, video games, etc knowing what we know now. Some of ... Read full review

Review: Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software

User Review  - Andrea - Goodreads

Nabeel Hamdi in his book on development constantly refers to the idea of emergence, which he draws from this book by Steven Johnson. Another bit of pop science applied to the world and I wasn't too ... Read full review

Contents

Here Comes Everybody
11
P A R T O N
29
PA R T T W
73
P A R T T N R E
195
Notes
235
Bibliography
265
Acknowledgments
275
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Environmental Sociology
John A. Hannigan
No preview available - 2006
All Book Search results »

About the author (2002)

Steven Johnson cofounded Feed, the Internet's acclaimed voice on technology, science, and culture. He is the author of Interface Culture and holds a B.A. in semiotics from Brown University and an M.A. in English from Columbia. He lives in New York City.

Bibliographic information