Long, Obstinate, and Bloody: The Battle of Guilford Courthouse

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Univ of North Carolina Press, Mar 15, 2009 - History - 320 pages
4 Reviews
On March 15, 1781, the armies of Nathanael Greene and Lord Charles Cornwallis fought one of the bloodiest and most intense engagements of the American Revolution at Guilford Courthouse in piedmont North Carolina. In Long, Obstinate, and Bloody, the first book-length examination of the Guilford Courthouse engagement, Lawrence E. Babits and Joshua B. Howard piece together what really happened on the wooded plateau in what is today Greensboro, North Carolina, and identify where individuals stood on the battlefield, when they were there, and what they could have seen, thus producing a new bottom-up story of the engagement.

 

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Review: Long, Obstinate, and Bloody: The Battle of Guilford Courthouse

User Review  - Andy - Goodreads

A very concise history of a central (if not the central)battle that lead to our nation's independence.Babits combines extensive research and an unbelievable passion to explain this battle as it should ... Read full review

Review: Long, Obstinate, and Bloody: The Battle of Guilford Courthouse

User Review  - Goodreads

A very concise history of a central (if not the central)battle that lead to our nation's independence.Babits combines extensive research and an unbelievable passion to explain this battle as it should ... Read full review

Contents

The Strategic Situation
1
1 The Race to the Dan
13
2 From the Dan to Guilford Courthouse
37
3 Greenes Army
52
4 The British Army Advances
79
5 The First Line
100
6 The Second Line
117
7 The Battle within a Battle
129
Epilogue
214
Order of Battle
219
Battle Casualties
223
Postwar Location of Pensioners by State of Service
227
Glossary
229
A Note on Sources
235
Notes
239
Bibliography
269

8 The Third Line
142
9 The Aftermath
170
10 The Guilford Crossroads
190

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About the author (2009)

Lawrence E. Babits is professor emeritus of history at East Carolina University.

Joshua B. Howard is an independent scholar.

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