An Historical and Critical Dictionary, Volume 1

Front Cover
Hunt and Clarke, 1826 - Biography - 438 pages
 

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User Review  - keylawk - LibraryThing

Pierre Bayle (1647-1706), French philosophe and reviewer. After moving to Rotterdam, he devoted himself to writing this biographical and historical "dictionary", a seminal work appearing in parts in ... Read full review

Contents

I
29
II
31
III
32
IV
41
V
43
VI
52
VII
53
VIII
58
XXXIII
189
XXXIV
209
XXXV
211
XXXVI
219
XXXVII
220
XXXVIII
229
XXXIX
235
XL
251

IX
60
X
67
XI
76
XII
78
XIII
81
XIV
84
XV
92
XVI
95
XVII
101
XVIII
113
XIX
121
XX
123
XXI
124
XXII
133
XXIII
134
XXIV
145
XXV
148
XXVI
152
XXVII
170
XXVIII
178
XXIX
182
XXX
183
XXXI
184
XXXII
187
XLI
255
XLII
257
XLIII
260
XLIV
263
XLV
270
XLVI
273
XLVIII
280
XLIX
281
L
288
LI
292
LII
297
LIII
310
LIV
330
LV
333
LVI
344
LVII
346
LVIII
347
LIX
348
LX
353
LXI
377
LXII
381
LXIII
383
LXIV
387
LXV
392

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Page 356 - Then answered one of the servants and said, Behold, I have seen a son of Jesse the Beth-lehemite, that is cunning in playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the LORD is with him.
Page 368 - And Michal the daughter of Saul came out to meet David, and said, How glorious was the king of Israel to-day, who uncovered himself to-day in the eyes of the handmaids of his servants, as one of the vain fellows shamelessly uncovereth himself!
Page 370 - And he brought forth the people that were therein, and put them under saws, and under harrows of iron, and under axes of iron, and made them pass through the brickkiln : and thus did he unto all the cities of the children of Ammon.
Page 205 - I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them; and that the having of general ideas, is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes; and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to. For it is evident, we observe no footsteps in them, of making use of general signs for universal ideas; from which we have reason to imagine, that they have not the faculty of abstracting, or making general ideas, since they have no use of words,...
Page 311 - Before the seas, and this terrestrial ball, And heaven's high canopy, that covers all, One was the face of Nature, if a face Rather a rude and indigested mass: A lifeless lump, unfashioned and unframed, Of jarring seeds, and justly Chaos named.
Page 148 - Nay, but O man, who art thou that repliest against God ? Shall the thing formed say to him that formed it, Why hast thou made me thus...
Page 313 - And foes are sundered by a larger space. The force of fire ascended first on high, And took its dwelling in the vaulted sky. Then air succeeds, in lightness next to fire; Whose atoms from unactive earth retire. Earth sinks beneath, and draws a numerous throng Of ponderous, thick, unwieldy seeds along. About her coasts unruly waters roar, And rising on a ridge, insult the shore.
Page 127 - AS 29, 2 : usus vivendi eidem hic fuit : primum ut, si facultas esset, id est si non cum uxore cubuisset, matutinis horis in larario suo, in quo et divos principes sed optimos electos et animas sanctiores, in...
Page 148 - Hath not the potter power over the clay, of the same lump to make one vessel unto honour, and another unto dishonour?
Page 311 - Nor, pois'd, did on her own foundations lie: Nor seas about the shores their arms had thrown; But earth and air and water were in one.

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