A Tale of Love and Darkness

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Nov 1, 2005 - Biography & Autobiography - 544 pages
Winner of the National Jewish Book Award

International Bestseller

"[An] ingenious work that circles around the rise of a state, the tragic destiny of a mother, a boy’s creation of a new self." — The New Yorker

A family saga and a magical self-portrait of a writer who witnessed the birth of a nation and lived through its turbulent history. A Tale of Love and Darkness is the story of a boy who grows up in war-torn Jerusalem, in a small apartment crowded with books in twelve languages and relatives speaking nearly as many. The story of an adolescent whose life has been changed forever by his mother’s suicide. The story of a man who leaves the constraints of his family and community to join a kibbutz, change his name, marry, have children. The story of a writer who becomes an active participant in the political life of his nation.

"One of the most enchanting and deeply satisfying books that I have read in many years." — New Republic
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - suesbooks - LibraryThing

I was pleased to learn about the great writer Amos Oz, and to learn so much about the history of the State of Israel from someone who lived through it. The book was a little bit too long with a little too much detail and too many repetitions. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - TheAmpersand - LibraryThing

If you can call your autobiography "A Tale of Love and Darkness" and make it seem halfway appropriate, you've probably done something right. Despite its dramatic -- if well-earned -- title, Amos Oz's ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

About the Author
539
About the Translator
541
Back Flap
549
Back Cover
550
Spine
551
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

AMOS OZ (1939 – 2018) was born in Jerusalem. He was the recipient of the Prix Femina, the Frankfurt Peace Prize, the Goethe Prize, the Primo Levi Prize, and the National Jewish Book Award, among other international honors. His work has been translated into forty-four languages. 

NICHOLAS DE LANGE is a professor at the University of Cambridge and a renowned translator. He has translated Amos Oz’s work since the 1960s.

Bibliographic information