Manual of Electricity

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publisher not identified, 1825 - Electricity - 83 pages
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Page 2 - In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, " An Act for the Encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Chart*. and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned." And also to the act, entitled, " An Act supplementary to an Act, entitled " An Act for the Encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the time* therein mentioned,"...
Page 2 - IDE, of the said District, hath deposited in this office, the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit : " Inductive Grammar, designed for beginners. By an Instructer." In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States...
Page 35 - ... the spectator; it will gradually come from the more distant parts of the course of the electricity, and last of all, will be heard from the remote extremity ; and the different degrees of the agitation of the air, and likewise the difference of the distance, will account for the different intensities of the sound, and its apparent reverberations and changes.
Page 13 - The electric fluid is attracted by points. We do not know whether this property is in lightning. But since they agree in all the particulars wherein we can already compare them, is it not probable they agree likewise in this ? Let the experiment be made.
Page 34 - It may not be uninteresting to give a further illustration of this idea: electrical effects take place in no sensible time ; it has been found, that a discharge through a circuit of four miles, is instantaneous ; but sound moves at the rate of about twelve miles in a minute. Now, supposing the lightning to pass through a space of some miles, the explosion will be first heard from the point of the air agitated, nearest to the spectator ; it will gradually come from the more distant parts of the course...
Page 82 - ... gently backwards, the upper part of the windpipe, to allow a more free admission of air: blow the bellows gently, in order to inflate the lungs, till the breast be a little raised; the mouth and nostrils should then be set free, and a moderate pressure made with the hand upon the chest. Repeat this process till life appears.
Page 34 - Ihunder, which is more or less intense, and of longer or shorter duration, according to the quantity of air acted upon, and the distance of the place where the report is heard from the point of its discharge.
Page 83 - Nor crown with festive rites the' auspicious day; Such feast might prove more fatal than the waves, Than war or famine. While the vital fire Burns feebly, heap not the green fuel on; But prudently foment the wandering spark With what the soonest...
Page 82 - Mouth or Nostrils exactly close, for the space of Half a Minute, or a Minute, then let them free ; but if no perceptible sign of Life appears, then introduce the Pipe of a Bellows (when no Apparatus is at hand) into one Nostril ; the other, and the Mouth being closed...
Page 83 - Suspension by the Cord. — 1. A few ounces of blood may be taken from the jugular vein, and cuppingDELUS.

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