When Work Disappears: The World of the New Urban Poor

Front Cover
Vintage Books, 1996 - Political Science - 322 pages
30 Reviews
Wilson, one of our foremost authorities on race and poverty, challenges decades of liberal and conservative pieties to look squarely at the devastating effects that joblessness has had on our urban ghettos. Marshaling a vast array of data and the personal stories of hundreds of men and women, Wilson persuasively argues that problems endemic to America's inner cities--from fatherless households to drugs and violent crime--stem directly from the disappearance of blue-collar jobs in the wake of a globalized economy. Wilson's achievement is to portray this crisis as one that affects all Americans, and to propose solutions whose benefits would be felt across our society. At a time when welfare is ending and our country's racial dialectic is more strained than ever, When Work Disappears is a sane, courageous, and desperately important work.



"Wilson is the keenest liberal analyst of the most perplexing of all American problems...[This book is] more ambitious and more accessible than anything he has done before."
--The New Yorker
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
12
3 stars
13
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: When Work Disappears: The World of the New Urban Poor

User Review  - Goodreads

If you have ever wondered why the segregated neighborhoods of America are rampant with crime, drug use, misguided youth and joblessness, Wilson's work offers some answers. Best taken in small doses. Read full review

Review: When Work Disappears: The World of the New Urban Poor

User Review  - Michael - Goodreads

If you have ever wondered why the segregated neighborhoods of America are rampant with crime, drug use, misguided youth and joblessness, Wilson's work offers some answers. Best taken in small doses. Read full review

Contents

From Institutional to Jobless Ghettos
3
Societal Changes and Vulnerable
25
Neighborhoods
51
The Fading InnerCity Family
87
The American Belief System Concerning
149
Racial Antagonisms and RaceBased
183
Social Policy Options
2-7
APPENDIXES
2-39
NOTES 753
2-61
BIBLIOGRAPHY 283
2-83
INDEX
309
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1996)

William Julius Wilson, an American sociologist, received his Ph.D. from Washington State University in 1966 and teaches at the University of Chicago. His scholarly work, written from both historical and sociological perspectives, has concentrated on the condition of African Americans living in inner cities, especially the underclass. He stresses urban divisions separating the middle class from the poor.

Bibliographic information