Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life

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Harper Collins, May 1, 2007 - Biography & Autobiography - 384 pages
157 Reviews

Bestselling author Barbara Kingsolver returns with her first nonfiction narrative that will open your eyes in a hundred new ways to an old truth: You are what you eat.

"As the U.S. population made an unprecedented mad dash for the Sun Belt, one carload of us paddled against the tide, heading for the Promised Land where water falls from the sky and green stuff grows all around. We were about to begin the adventure of realigning our lives with our food chain.

"Naturally, our first stop was to buy junk food and fossil fuel. . . ."

Hang on for the ride: With characteristic poetry and pluck, Barbara Kingsolver and her family sweep readers along on their journey away from the industrial-food pipeline to a rural life in which they vow to buy only food raised in their own neighborhood, grow it themselves, or learn to live without it. Their good-humored search yields surprising discoveries about turkey sex life and overly zealous zucchini plants, en route to a food culture that's better for the neighborhood and also better on the table. Part memoir, part journalistic investigation, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle makes a passionate case for putting the kitchen back at the center of family life and diversified farms at the center of the American diet.

"This is the story of a year in which we made every attempt to feed ourselves animals and vegetables whose provenance we really knew . . . and of how our family was changed by our first year of deliberately eating food produced from the same place where we worked, went to school, loved our neighbors, drank the water, and breathed the air."

 

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User Review  - laytonwoman3rd - LibraryThing

After years of spending summers at her husband's farm in southwestern Virginia, growing as much food as possible, Kingsolver and her family moved there permanently from Tucson, with a plan to spend ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lisa.schureman - LibraryThing

copy I know there are those that didn't like this book as the author came across smug, self-righteous, and preachy. Would I be able to do a year through fresh food? No, I don't have the land or help ... Read full review

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Contents

Called Home
1
Late March
23
Springing Forward
43
Stalking the Vegetannual
63
April
70
The Birds and the Bees
86
May
100
MidJune
111
September
219
September
242
October
259
NovemberDecember
277
What Do You Eat in January?
296
FebruaryMarch
315
Time Begins
334
Acknowledgments
353

Late June
124
Late June
148
Late June
154
July
173
August
196
References
355
Organizations
358
Sidebar Resources
364
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Barbara Kingsolver's work has been translated into more than twenty languages and has earned a devoted readership at home and abroad. In 2000 she was awarded the National Humanities Medal, our country's highest honor for service through the arts. She received the 2011 Dayton Literary Peace Prize for the body of her work, and in 2010 won Britain's Orange Prize for The Lacuna. Before she made her living as a writer, Kingsolver earned degrees in biology and worked as a scientist. She now lives with her family on a farm in southern Appalachia.

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