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Books Books 1 - 10 of 26 on In listening to music, the same is even more strikingly true. If we abruptly see....
" In listening to music, the same is even more strikingly true. If we abruptly see a dark moving form in the woods, our heart stops beating, and we catch our breath instantly and before any articulate idea of danger can arise. If our friend goes near to... "
The Philosophy of the Spirit: A Study of the Spiritual Nature of Man and the ... - Page 209
by Horatio Willis Dresser - 1908 - 545 pages
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Mind, Volume 9

George Croom Robertson, George Frederick Stout - Electronic journals - 1884
...stops beating, and we catch our breath instantly and before any articulate idea of danger can arise. If our friend goes near to the edge of a precipice,...to be safe, and have no distinct imagination of his fall. The writer well remembers his astonishment, when a boy of seven or eight, at fainting when he...
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The Principles of Psychology, Volume 2

William James - Psychology - 1890
...stops beating, and we catch our breath instantly and before any articulate idea of danger can arise. If our friend goes near to the edge of a precipice,...all-overishness.' and we shrink back, although we positivelv know him to be safe, and have no distinct imagination of his fall. The writer well remembers...
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The Principles of Psychology, Volume 2

William James - Psychology - 1908
...friend goes near to the edge oi a precipice, we get the well-known feeling of ' all-overishuess\.' and we shrink back, although we positively know him...to be safe, and have no distinct imagination of his fall. The writer well remembers his astonishment, when a boy of seven or eight, at fainting when he...
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Psychology

William James - Psychology - 1892 - 478 pages
...stops beating, and we catch our breath instantly and before any articulate idea of danger can arise. If our friend goes near to the edge of a precipice,...to be safe, and have no distinct imagination of his fall. The writer well remembers his astonishment, when a boy of seven or eight, at fainting when he...
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The Principles of Psychology, Volume 2

William James - Psychology - 1902
...instantly and before any articulate idea of danger can arise. If our friend goes near to the edge oi a precipice, we get the well-known feeling of 'all-overishness.'...positively know him to be safe, and have no distinct iir agination of his fall. The writer well remembers his astonishment, when a boy of seven or eight,...
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The Classical Psychologists: Selections Illustrating Psychology from ...

Philosophers - 1912 - 734 pages
...stops beating, and we catch our breath instantly and before any articulate idea of danger can arise. If our friend goes near to the edge of a precipice,...to be safe, and have no distinct imagination of his fall. The writer well remembers his astonishment, when a boy of seven or eight, at fainting when he...
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The Classical Psychologists: Selections Illustrating Psychology from ...

Benjamin Rand - Philosophers - 1912 - 734 pages
...stops beating, and we catch our breath instantly and before any articulate idea of danger can arise. If our friend goes near to the edge of a precipice,...back, although we positively know him to be safe, PSYCHOLOGY 659 and have no distinct imagination of his fall. The writer well remembers his astonishment,...
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Mental, Divine and Faith Healings: Their Explanation and Place [by] J ...

John Macphail Waggett - Mental healing - 1919 - 259 pages
...heart stops beating, and we catch our breath instantly before any articulate idea of danger can arise. If our friend goes near to the edge of a precipice,...we get the well-known feeling of "all-overishness," although positively we know him to be safe, and have no distinct imagination of his fall. The writer...
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Collected Essays and Reviews

William James - Philosophy - 1920 - 516 pages
...beating, and we catch our breath instantly and before any 258 articulate idea of danger can arise. If our friend goes near to the edge of a precipice,...to be safe, and have no distinct imagination of his fall. The writer well remembers his astonishment, when a boy of seven or eight, at fainting when he...
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The Principles of Psychology, Vol. 2

William James - 1963 - 897 pages
...stops beating, and we catch our breath instantly and before any articulate idea of danger can arise. If our friend goes near to the edge of a precipice,...although we positively know him to be safe, and have no distinet imagination of his fall, The writer well remembers his astonishment, when a boy of seven or...
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