History of the Germantown Academy: Comp. from the Minutes of the Trustees. From 1760 to 1877

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Ferguson bros. & Company, 1882 - 64 pages
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Page 40 - Great was the majesty and hand of the Lord! Great was the fear that fell upon all flesh! I saw no lofty or airy countenance; nor heard any vain jesting to move men to laughter; nor witty repartee to raise mirth; nor extravagant feasting to excite the lusts and desires of the flesh above measure. But every face gathered paleness, and many hearts were humbled...
Page 18 - Another quarrel soon separated him from that institution, and he erected a house on an adjoining lot, where he established an opposition school ; but this undertaking was unsuccessful, and shortly abandoned, and we hear no more of Mr. Dove. He is said to have been a good scholar, and distinguished for his powers of elocution. He had an ardent and peculiar temper, and was whimsical even in his discipline. Amongst several amusing instances, Mr. Graydon...
Page 31 - There was a period of time in the latter part of the last century and the early part of this one when the national forests were laid out and established. We are not going to have any new national forests or any additions to them. The pattern was fixed then and there.
Page 36 - A school or schools shall be established in each county by the legislature for the convenient instruction of youth, with such salaries to the masters paid by the public as may enable them to instruct youth at low prices: And all useful learning shall be duly encouraged and promoted in one or more universities.
Page 37 - Christians shall be capable of being elected trustees, nor shall any person either as master, tutor, officer or pupil be refused admittance for his conscientious persuasion in matters of religion, provided he shall demean himself in a sober, orderly manner, and conform to the rules and regulations of the school.
Page 25 - ... Grammatically, attended with lectures. . . . The Board having deliberated . . . Resolved. That the Instructions of the youth In the Languages Grammatically, and with Suitable lectures at the same time . . . will undoubtedly tend to the most effectual Advancement of the Knowledge of the Scholars. . . . But the Board Is nevertheless of the opinion, that every parent and guardian should have In his election to direct whether his child or ward shall be taught in the above manner, or in the usual...
Page 9 - ... Germantown," it had its origin in "The Germantown Union School." The first entry in the minute book of the board of trustees states that "At a meeting of several of the inhabitants of Germantown, and places adjacent, at the house of Daniel Mackinett, in said town,, on the 6th day of December, 1759, it was unanimously agreed upon by those present that a large, commodious school-house should be erected in said town, near the centre thereof, two rooms on the lower floor whereof should be for the...
Page 36 - ... it therefore enacted and it is hereby enacted by the Representatives of the Freemen of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met and by the authority of the same, That there be erected and hereby is erected and established at Germantown in the county of Philadelphia, a public school for the instruction of youth in the learned and foreign languages, reading and writing English, the mathematics, and other useful branches of literature...
Page 25 - ... the most effectual Advancement of the Knowledge of the Scholars. . . . But the Board Is nevertheless of the opinion, that every parent and guardian should have In his election to direct whether his child or ward shall be taught in the above manner, or in the usual mode taught in common schools. . . . Many parents and guardians may not incline to have their children or wards taught In any other manner than what has been hitherto practiced in this school. The . . . English Master . . . shall be...
Page 36 - Legislature," &c. ; the 2d section apologizes for not establishing such schools, because " the finances of this State, so soon after a long and expensive war, are not in a condition (without an increase of taxes already heavy) to carry into execution " these constitutional requirements ; therefore, it became "highly proper to promote the laudable attempt of the petitioners,

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