A Practical Grammar of the Sanskrit Language: Arranged with Reference to the Classical Languages of Europe, for the Use of English Students

Front Cover
Clarendon Press, 1864 - Sanskrit language - 409 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xiv - PANINI'S arrangement is simple; but numerous exceptions and frequent digressions have involved it in much seeming confusion. The two first lectures (the first section especially, which is in a manner the key of the whole grammar) contain definitions ; in the three next are collected the affixes, by which verbs and nouns are inflected. Those which appertain to verbs occupy the third lecture : the fourth and fifth contain such as are affixed to nouns. The remaining three lectures treat of the changes...
Page xiv - Sutras renders them in the highest degree obscure; even with the knowledge of the key to their interpretation, the student finds them ambiguous. In the application of them, when understood, he discovers many seeming contradictions ; and, with every exertion of practised memory, he must experience the utmost difficulty in combining rules dispersed in apparent confusion through different portions of Pánini's eight lectures.
Page 381 - Let the student, therefore, distinguish between the infinitive of Sanskrit and that of Latin and Greek. In these latter languages we have the infinitive made the subject of a proposition ; or, in other words, standing in the place of a nominative, and an accusative case often admissible before it. We have it also assuming different forms, to express present, past, or future time, and completeness or incompleteness in the progress of the action. The...
Page xiv - The endless pursuit of exceptions and of limitations so disjoins the general precepts, that the reader cannot keep in view their intended connexion and mutual relation. He wanders in an intricate maze, and the clew of the labyrinth is continually slipping from his hands.
Page 388 - having heard this, having thought to himself " this is certainly a dog," having abandoned the goat, having bathed, he went to his own house.
Page 381 - ... two cases, an accusative and dative, is inherent, and which differs from other substantives in its power of governing a case. Its use as a substantive, with the force of the accusative case, corresponds to one use of the Latin infinitive ; thus, ТП£ ЧГ^ чпдЧ ^«&i(*t ' I desire to hear all that/ ' id audire cupio,' where ^U{J and audire are both equivalent to accusative cases, themselves also governing an accusative.
Page 381 - ... nominative, and an accusative case often admissible before it. We have it also assuming different forms, to express present, past, or future time, and completeness or incompleteness in the progress of the action. The Sanskrit infinitive, on the other hand, can never be made the subject or nominative case to a verb, admits of no accusative before it, and can only express indeterminate time and incomplete action. Wherever it occurs it must be considered as the object, and never the subject, of...
Page xv - Sanskrit, may be traced to the labour imposed, of thoroughly mastering these rules at the first entrance upon the study of the language. They form, as it were, a mountain of difficulty to be passed at the very commencement of the journey ; and the learner cannot be convinced that when once surmounted, the ground beyond may be more smooth than in other languages, the ingress to which is comparatively easy.
Page xiii - ... others, since Mr. Williams has aimed at doing away with the cumbrous method of the grammarians of India, which was too often followed by his predecessors. He says : — " It is to be regretted that the Pandits of India should have overlaid their system, possessing, as it does, undeniable excellencies, with a network of mysticism. Had they designed to keep the key of the knowledge of their language, and to shut the door against the vulgar, they could hardly have invented a method more perplexing...
Page xiv - Let short a be held to have its organ of utterance Contracted, now we have reached the end of the work In which it was necessary to regard it as otherwise.

Bibliographic information