Guiana, Geographical and Historical: For the Use of Schools

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R. Short, 1857 - Guyana - 46 pages
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Page 30 - They cultivate the plantain-tree, cassava, and cotton on a tolerably extensive tract of ground, and they employ the cotton for weaving hammocks. These people are scarcely more barbarous than the naked Indians of the Missions, who have been taught to make the sign of the cross. It is a...
Page 10 - The geological structure of this region leaves but little doubt that it was once the bed of an inland lake, which by one of those catastrophes of which even later times give us examples, broke its barriers, and forced a path for its waters to the Atlantic...
Page 16 - ... territory is brought more before the British public than it has hitherto been, the colony will become a very important one ; for there are many products of that fertile land, of which the European knows little or nothing ; some he may know by name, and of others he has only seen small samples. No country on the surface of the globe can be compared with Guiana for its vigour and luxuriance of vegetation.
Page 42 - The government is vested in a governor, assisted by a privy council of seven members and the colonial council, elected by the people, for five years.
Page 19 - ... silver, but gold dust was so abundant that the natives sprinkled it all over their bodies, which they first anointed with a glutinous substance that it might stick to them.
Page 22 - Guiuna; but, in order to retain a power over him, the king did not grant him a pardon for the sentence passed upon him for his alleged treason. How far Raleigh knowingly deceived the court by his representations of rich discoveries, and gold mines, it is impossible now to ascertain ; but, having...
Page 37 - ... in vain. The charges brought against Mr. Smith on his trial were, those of habitually promoting, as far as in him lay. a spirit of discontent and dissatisfaction in the minds of the negroes against their lawful masters; of consulting and corresponding with a negro named Quamina, on an intended revolt and rebellion, and of aiding and assisting him by advice when the rebellion was in progress, and he knew Quamina to be engaged therein; of suppressing from the proper authorities knowledge of the...
Page 5 - ... are not well defined. The whole territory is said to have an area of 76,000 square miles, but the title to a great portion of this is disputed by Venezuela and Brazil. The physical geography of this country presents an alluvial flat, extending from the coast inland, varying in breadth from 10 to 40 miles, and terminating at the foot of a range of sand hills from 30 to 130 feet high. The inland country is traversed by several ranges of mountains, which frequently rise 1,000 to 5,000 feet above...
Page 30 - America there are tribes which dwell in villages, rear plantains, cassava, and cotton, and are scarcely more barbarous than those in the religious establishments, who have been taught to make the sign of the cross. It is an error to consider all the free natives as wandering hunters; for agriculture existed on the continent long before the...
Page 33 - ... in the year 1657 the first Dutch General West India Company, in consequence of recent losses in the Brazils and other causes, were disinclined to take much interest in them, and in the October of that year the management of the settlement in Essequebo was entrusted to a commission of eight persons — viz., two from Middleburg, one from Vlissingen, one from Veere, and four from the Chamber of Zealand, which last had endeavoured to organise the scanty possession on the Essequebo by establishing...

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