The Boston Almanac for the Year ..., Issue 2

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S.N. Dickinson, 1837 - Almanacs, American
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Page 28 - A letter composed of two pieces of paper, is charged with double these rates; of three pieces, with triple; and of four pieces, with quadruple. " One or more pieces of paper, mailed as a letter, and weighing...
Page 28 - Speaker and Clerk of the House of Representatives; President and Secretary of the Senate; and any individual who shall have been, or may hereafter be, President of the United States ; and each may receive newspapers by post, free of postage. Each member of the Senate, and each member and delegate of the House of Representatives, may send and receive, free of postage, newspapers, letters, and packets, weighing...
Page 28 - Newspaper Postage. For each Newspaper, not carried out of the State in which it is published, or, if carried out of the State, not carried over 100 miles, 1 cent.
Page 28 - Each member of the Senate, and each member and delegate of the House of Representatives, may send and receive, free of postage, newspapers, letters, and packets, weighing not more than two ounces (in case of excess of weight...
Page 10 - A rural cemetery seems to combine in itself all the advantages which can be proposed to gratify human feelings, or tranquilize human fears ; to secure the best religious influences, and to cherish all those associations which cast a cheerful light over the darkness of the grave. " And What spot can be more appropriate than this, for such a purpose ? Nature seems to point it out with significant energy, as the favorite retirement for the dead. — There are around us all the varied features of her...
Page 28 - Congress. Postmasters may send and receive, free of postage, letters and packets, not exceeding half an ounce in weight ; and they may receive one daily newspaper each, or what is equivalent thereto. Printers of Newspapers may send one paper to each and every other printer of newspapers within the United States, free of postage, under such regulations as the Postmaster- General may provide.
Page 28 - Privilege of Franking. Letters and packets to and from the following officers of the government, are by law received and conveyed by post, free of postage. The President and...
Page 28 - The postage on Ship Letters, if delivered at the office where the vessel arrives, is six cents ; if conveyed by post, two cents in addition to the ordinary postage. Privilege of Franking. Letters and packets to and from the following officers of the government, are by law received and conveyed by post, free of postage. The President and Vice-President of the United States; Secretaries of State, Treasury, War, and Navy...
Page 28 - State, but not carried over 100 miles, 1 cent — Over 100 miles, and out of the State in which it is published, 1 1-2 cents.
Page 10 - And what spot can be more appropriate than this, for such a purpose ? Nature seems to point it out with significant energy, as the favorite retirement for the dead. There are around us all the varied features of her beauty and grandeur ; the forest-crowned height ; the abrupt acclivity; the sheltered valley ; the deep glen ; the grassy glade ; and the silent grove.

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