The Great Fight: Poems and Sketches

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G.P. Putnam's sons, 1908 - 158 pages
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Page x - I have felt that while many of the English-speaking public know perhaps as well as myself the FrenchCanadian of the cities, yet they have had little opportunity of becoming acquainted with the habitant, therefore I have endeavored to paint a few types, and in doing this, it has seemed to me that I could best attain the object in view by having my friends tell their own tales in their own way, as they would relate them to English-speaking auditors not conversant with the French tongue.
Page 80 - I mak' heem sweat, You can see de water droppin' all aroun' hees neck an' face ; "Now, Chibougamou," I tell heem, "hurry up, an' mebbe yet You 'll have chance again to try it w'en you leave me on ma place." So we have a beeg procession, w'en we pass on St. Elie, All de parish comin, lookin...
Page vi - To sing for those who know not how to praise The woodsman's life, the farmer's patient toil. The peaceful drama of laborious days. He made his own the thoughts of simple men, And with the touch that makes the world akin A welcome guest of lonely cabin homes, Found, too, no heart he could not enter in. The toilworn doctor, women, children, men, The humble heroes of the lumber drives, Love, laugh, or weep along his peopled verse. Blithe 'mid the pathos of their meagre lives. While thus the poet-love...
Page 78 - m feelin' purty sore, But of all de troub an' worry, de skeeter, he 's de boss. Beeg? lak de leetle two-mont' robin. Sing? lak a sawmill on de spring. Put de blanket roun' your body an
Page 8 - Ge"deon Plouffe the tragedy retold as The Wreck of the Julie Plante, a poem of which he himself thought little, and never cared to recite, but which had made its way through the length and breadth of the American continent before ever his first book of poems was published. It was the old lumberman's...
Page 74 - An' she want to be a lookin' on de sky, So of course de cole win' hit her on de nose — "I'll come up again," she say, "on de spring tam, bimeby, But I 'm better now below, " and off she goes. Dat 's de way I feel mese'f on de farm a year ago, Were ev'ryt'ing should be a pleasan' dream; Lak de foolish reever dere, I 'm not satisfy below, So I got to let me off a leetle steam. Den a man he come along an...
Page 10 - Plouffe the tragedy retold as The Wreck of the Julie Plante, a poem of which he himself thought little, and never cared to recite, but which had made its way through the length and breadth of the American continent before ever his first book of poems was published. It was the old lumberman's reiteration of the words, 'An...
Page 76 - Were ev'ryt'ing should be a pleasan' dream; Lak de foolish reever dere, I 'm not satisfy below, So I got to let me off a leetle steam. Den a man he come along an' he say to me, "Look here — Don't you know that place dey call Chibougamou Were de diamon' lie aroun' like de mushroom on de groun', An' dey 're findin' all de gole an
Page 78 - Beeg? lak de leetle two-mont' robin. Sing? lak a sawmill on de spring. Put de blanket roun' your body an' den he bite you troo. Me, I never tak' hees measure, but I t'ink across de wing He's t'ree inch sure — dem skeeter, on dat place Chibougamou. De man he's goin' wit' me, never paddle, never haul, Jus...
Page 81 - Louise an' me is happy, no matter if we 're poor. So de diamon' may be plaintee, lak de gravel walk you see Wen you 're comin' near de house of ole Telesphore Beaulieu, But me, I got a diamon

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