The Works of William E. Channing, Volume 2

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J. Munroe, 1843 - Slavery
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Page 378 - It is chiefly through books that we enjoy intercourse with superior minds, and these invaluable means of communication are in the reach of all. In the best books, great men talk to us, give us their most precious thoughts, and pour their souls into ours.
Page 17 - A slave is one who is in the power of a master to whom he belongs. The master may sell him, dispose of his person, his industry and his labor. He can do nothing, possess nothing, nor acquire anything but what must belong to his master.
Page 19 - The consciousness of our humanity involves the persuasion that we cannot be owned as a tree or a brute. As men we cannot justly be made slaves. Then no man can be rightfully enslaved. In casting the yoke from ourselves as an unspeakable wrong, we condemn ourselves as wrong-doers and oppressors in laying it on any who share our nature. It is not necessary to inquire whether a man, by extreme guilt, may not forfeit the rights of his nature, and be justly punished with slavery. On this point crude notions...
Page 408 - The path to perfection is difficult to men in every lot ; there is no royal road for rich or poor. But difficulties are meant to rouse, not discourage. The human spirit is to grow strong by conflict.
Page 366 - ... exquisite workmanship, and that I were to learn, that neither man, woman, nor child ever cast an eye at these miracles of art, how should I feel their privation ; how should I want to open their eyes, and to help them to comprehend and feel the loveliness and grandeur which in vain courted their notice ? But every husbandman is living in sight of the works of a diviner Artist ; and how much would his existence be elevated, could he see the glory which shines forth in their forms, hues, proportions,...
Page 105 - The manner in which the duty of servants or slaves is inculcated, therefore, affords no ground for the assertion, that the Gospel authorizes one man to hold another in bondage, any more than the command to honor the king, when that king was Nero, authorized the tyranny of the emperor ; or than the command to turn the other cheek, when one is smitten, justifies the infliction of violence by an injurious man."* * Wayland's " Elements of Moral Science,
Page 237 - Louisiana, but shall admit an independent community, invested with sovereignty, into the confederation ; and can the treaty-making power do this ? Can it receive foreign nations, however vast, to the Union ? Does not the question carry its own answer ? By the assumption of such a right, would not the old compact be at once considered as dissolved ? To me it seems not only the right, but the duty of the Free States, in case of the annexation of Texas, to say to the Slave-holding States, "We regard...
Page 27 - Wherever we see a man, we see the possessor of these great capacities. Did God make such a being to be owned as a tree or a brute ? How plainly was he made to exercise, unfold, improve his highest powers, made for a moral, spiritual good ! and how is he wronged, and his Creator opposed, when he is forced and broken into a tool to another's physical enjoyment ! Such a being was plainly made for an end in himself. He is a person, not a thing. He is an end, not a mere instrument or means.
Page 378 - God be thanked for books ! They are the voices of the distant and the dead, and make us heirs of the spiritual life of past ages. Books are the true levellers. They give to all who will faithfully use them, the society, the spiritual presence of the best and greatest of our race.
Page 159 - Whilst, in obedience to conscience, they have refrained from opposing force to force, they have still persevered, amidst menace and insult, in bearing their testimony against wrong, in giving utterance to their deep convictions. Of such men, I do not hesitate to say, that they have rendered to freedom a more essential service than any body of men among us.

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