The Puzzle Palace: A Report on America's Most Secret Agency

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Penguin Books, 1983 - History - 655 pages
10 Reviews

 In this remarkable tour de force of investigative reporting, James Bamford exposes the inner workings of America's largest, most secretive, and arguably most intrusive intelligence agency. The NSA has long eluded public scrutiny, but The Puzzle Palace penetrates its vast network of power and unmasks the people who control it, often with shocking disregard for the law. With detailed information on the NSA's secret role in the Korean Airlines disaster, Iran-Contra, the first Gulf War, and other major world events of the 80s and 90s, this is a brilliant account of the use and abuse of technological espionage.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - KirkLowery - LibraryThing

The first book of three on the NSA, written over the years. I'm reading all three in honor of the current PRISM brouhaha. Main takeaway: the NSA is the largest, most expensive agency in government. It ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kevinashley - LibraryThing

This book, dating from 1982, is a description of the current and past activities of the US National Security Agency (NSA), the largest and most expensive of the intelligence organisations in the US ... Read full review

Contents

I
11
II
15
III
20
Copyright

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About the author (1983)

James Bamford's The Puzzle Palace was a national bestseller when it was first published and now regarded as a classic. He was until recently Washington Investigative Producer for ABC's World News Tonight with Peter Jennings and has written investigative cover stories for the New York Times Magazine, the Washington Post Magazine, and the Los Angeles Times Magazine.

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