An Encyclopędia of Agriculture: Comprising the Theory and Practice of the Valuation, Transfer, Laying Out, Improvement, and Management of Landed Property; and the Cultivation and Economy of the Animal and Vegetable Productions of Agriculture, Including All the Latest Improvements; a General History of Agriculture in All Countries; and a Statistical View of Its Present State, with Suggestions for Its Future Progress in the British Isles

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1826 - Agriculture - 1226 pages
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Contents

Of the Present State of Agriculture
59
IIL Of the present State of Agriculture
65
Present State of Agriculture in Holland
72
Present State of Agriculture in Germany
87
Of the present State of Agriculture in
100
Present State of the Agriculture an Swe
108
Chap V
122
Present State of Agriculture in Ultra European
138
man Empire in Java Malacca Siam
152
BOOK II
202
BOOK I
208
Chap III
216
It Simple Products
226
Process of Vegetable Nutrition
233
Process of Vegetable Dcvelopement
240
Of the Sexuality of Vegetables
248
Evidence and Character of Vegetable
254
Civil Causes affecting the Distribution
269
BOOK II
280
Chap III
288
Asian Pathology or the Duration Disease
293
Chap VIII
299
Of tbe Modes of killing Animals
307
W Of the Uses of the Soil to Vegetables
315
Mttmiion of the constituent Parts of Soils
321
Chap II
327
Ww A7 of Heat Light
342
Ajency of the Atmosphere in Vogeta
349
1 Ofihe Canute of Britain 300
361
Utensils used in Agriculture 3fi8
368
Of Machines for Sowing and Planting
386
Of Rollers
394
Machines for threshing and otherwise
402
Edifices in use in Agriculture
408
Buildings as Repositories and for perform
414
Of the Stackyard Dungyard and other
422
Of the Fences used in Agriculture
430
Of Gates appropriate to Agriculture 410
445
Agricultural Labors of the Simplest Kind i
451
Mixed Operations performed by Manual
460
Chap II
468
Operations for the Care of Live Stock
469
Chap III
477
PART III
494
Chap III
500
Of the Choice of the Demesne or Site for
508
Of the Form and Materials of Road I
516
Of Railroad
542
Chap V
550
Of the Improvement of Estates by the Estab
556
Of the Establishment of Fisheries 5t
563

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Page 344 - ... at the means frequently employed by gardeners to protect tender plants from cold, as it appeared to me impossible that a thin mat, or any such flimsy substance, could prevent them from attaining the temperature of the atmosphere, by which alone I thought them liable to be injured. But, when I had learned that bodies on the surface of the earth become, during a still and serene night, colder than the atmosphere, by radiating their heat to the heavens, I perceived immediately a just reason for...
Page 10 - Also he built towers in the desert, and digged many wells: for he had much cattle, both in the low country, and in the plains; husbandmen also, and vinedressers in the mountains, and in Carmel: for he loved husbandry.
Page 42 - My father was a yeoman and had no lands of his own ; only he had a farm of three or four pounds by the year at the uttermost, and hereupon he tilled so much as kept half a dozen men. He had walk for a hundred sheep and my mother milked thirty kine...
Page i - Improvement, and Management of Landed Property, and the Cultivation and Economy of the Animal and Vegetable Productions of Agriculture, including all the latest Improvements. A general History of Agriculture in all Countries, and a Statistical View of its present State, with suggestions for its future progress in the British Isles.
Page 128 - He also quoted some evidence in support of the view that the disease occurred at the end of the seventeenth and beginning of the eighteenth century in Germany and more definite evidence that it occurred in Upper Italy and Hungary in 1890.
Page 10 - And she went, and came, and gleaned in the field after the reapers : and her hap was to light on a part of the field belonging unto Boaz, who was of the kindred of Elimelech. And, behold, Boaz came from Beth-lehem, and said unto the reapers, The Lord be with you.
Page 10 - Woe unto them that join house to house, that lay field to field, Till there be no room, and ye be made to dwell alone in the midst of the land...
Page 338 - ... to their carbon and oxygen so as to become mild lime, or it combines with the soluble matters, and forms compounds, having less attraction for water than the pure vegetable substance. The case is the same with respect to most animal manures ; but the operation of the lime is different in different cases, and depends upon the nature of the animal matter.
Page 45 - The ordinary country houses are pitiful cots, built of stone, and covered with turves, having in them but one room, many of them no chimneys, the windows very small holes and not glazed.
Page 10 - For the fitches are not threshed with a threshing instrument, neither is a cart wheel turned about upon the cummin; but the fitches are beaten out with a staff, and the cummin with a rod.

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