The Collected Works of Jeremy Bentham: An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation

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Clarendon Press, Jan 11, 1996 - History - 456 pages
The new critical edition of the works and correspondence of Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832) is being prepared and published under the supervision of the Bentham Committee of University College London. In spite of his importance as jurist, philosopher, and social scientist, and leader of the Utilitarian reformers, the only previous edition of his works was a poorly edited and incomplete one brought out within a decade or so of his death. Eight volumes of the new Collected Works, five of correspondence, and three of writings on jurisprudence, appeared between 1968 and 1981, published by the Athlone Press. Further volumes in the series since then are published by Oxford University Press. The overall plan and principles of the edition are set out in the General Preface to The Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham, vol. 1, which was the first volume of the Collected Works to be published. An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation, Jeremy Bentham's best-known work, is a classic text in modern philosophy and jurisprudence. First published in 1789, it contains the important statement of the foundations of utilitarian philosophy and a pioneering study of crime and punishment, both of which remain at the heart of contemporary debates in moral and political philosophy, economics, and legal theory. Printed here in full is the definitive edition, edited by the distinguished scholars J. H. Burns and H. L. A. Hart. An introductory essay by Hart, first published in 1982 and a widely acknowledged classic in its own right, is reprinted here. It contains an important analysis of Bentham's principle of utility, theory of action, and an account of the relationship between law and morality. A new introduction by the leading Bentham scholar F. Rosen, specially written for this Clarendon Paperback edition, provides students with a helpful survey of Bentham's main ideas and an extensive bibliographical study of recent critical work on Bentham. Professor Rosen's essay also contains a new analysis of the principle of utility in Bentham's philosophy which is compared with its use in Hume and J. S. Mill.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
xxxi
OF THE PRINCIPLE OF UTILITY
11
OF PRINCIPLES ADVERSE TO THAT OF UTILITY
17
OF THE FOUR SANCTIONS OR SOURCES OF PAIN AND PLEASURE
34
VALUE OF A LOT OF PLEASURE OR PAIN HOW TO BE MEASURED
38
PLEASURES AND PAINS THEIR KINDS
42
OF CIRCUMSTANCES INFLUENCING SENSIBILITY
51
OF HUMAN ACTIONS IN GENERAL
74
OF MOTIVES
96
OF HUMAN DISPOSITIONS IN GENERAL
125
OF THE CONSEQUENCES OF A MISCHIEVOUS ACT
143
CASES UNMEET FOR PUNISHMENT
158
OF THE PROPORTION BETWEEN PUNISHMENTS AND OFFENCES
165
OF THE PROPERTIES TO BE GIVEN TO A LOT OF PUNISHMENT
175
DIVISION OF OFFENCES
187
OF THE LIMITS OF THE PENAL BRANCH OF JURISPRUDENCE
281

OF INTENTIONALITY
84
OF CONSCIOUSNESS
90

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