The Vanishing Face of Gaia: A Final Warning

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Basic Books, Apr 14, 2009 - Science - 304 pages
15 Reviews
The global temperature is rising, the ice caps are melting, and levels of pollution across the world have reached unprecedented heights. According to eminent scientist James Lovelock, in order to survive an assault from her dependents, the Earth is lurching ever closer to a permanent “hot state.” Within the next century, we will almost certainly be forced to give up many of the comforts of western living as supplies are threatened. Only the fittest—and the smartest—will survive.

A reluctant jeremiad from one of the environmental movement’s elder statesmen, The Vanishing Face of Gaia offers an essential wake-up call for the human race.

 

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Review: The Vanishing Face of Gaia: A Final Warning

User Review  - Leslie Englehart - Goodreads

Well-written. Powerful. Sad. There is much that I don't agree with (particularly the beneficence of nuclear power), but some realistic prognosticating about where our over-population and greed are ... Read full review

Review: The Vanishing Face of Gaia: A Final Warning

User Review  - Chris Chester - Goodreads

Reads like the confused environmental treatise of an overly proud scientist who is very set in his ways, with a triumphal tone no doubt borne of the fact that he himself will not have to live with the ... Read full review

Contents

SOLAR ENERGY
NUCLEAR ENERGY
FOSSIL FUELS
RENEWABLE ENERGY
WIND ENERGY
FOOD AND LIVING SPACE
GEOENGINEERING TECHNIQUES
SEQUESTERING CARBON DIOXIDE
THE PROMISE OF THE BURIAL OF ELEMENTAL CARBON
GEOPHYSIOLOGY
PLANETARY MEDICINE AND ETHICS
THE JOURNEY IN SPACE AND TIME
CONSEQUENCES AND SURVIVAL
THE HISTORY OF GAIA THEORY
TO THE NEXT WORLD
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

James Lovelock is the author of more than two hundred scientific papers and the originator of the Gaia Hypothesis (now Gaia Theory). In September 2005, Prospect magazine named him as one of the world’s top 100 global public intellectuals. He lives in Louceston, England.

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