Surviving Coastal and Open Water

Front Cover
Stackpole Books, 2003 - Sports & Recreation - 298 pages
1 Review
The second in Greg Davenport's 'Books for the Wilderness' series, this book covers the techniques and equipment necessary for surviving in water. Photographs and drawings illustrate gear and techniques. Survival skills include keeping warm, creating a campsite, purifying and de-salting water, and finding food along the coast. Learn to navigate with a map, compass, and sexton and how to use a sea anchor and improvise sails. Learn how to signal for help, especially in open water.
 

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User Review  - Audra Walker - Christianbook.com

My son is only 10. And he loves this book.He comes to me telling me how to survive in many situations.Kyle says this is the best survival book he has read. He says it has the most information on survival. Everything you need to know!! Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Weather Forecasting
8
Gear
23
Vessel Distress
50
Clothing
75
Shelter
90
Fire
110
Signaling
122
Food
159
Navigation
197
Travel
237
Health
260
Dangerous Marine Life
276
Kits
285
Knots and Lashes
289
Copyright

Drinking Water
140

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 17 - Name of wind force 0 <1 Calm 1 1-3 Light air 2 4-6 Light breeze 3 7-10 Gentle breeze 4 11-16 Moderate breeze 5 17-21 Fresh breeze 6 22-27 Strong breeze 7 28-33 Near gale 8 34-40 Gale 9 41-47 Strong gale 10 48-55 Storm 11 56-63 Violent storm 12 >64 Hurricane Beaufort took his scale up to Force Twelve and left it there.
Page 17 - Sea heaps up and white foam from breaking waves begins to be blown in streaks along the direction of the wind. Moderately high waves of greater length ; edges of crests begin to break into spin-drift ; foam is blown in well-marked streaks along the direction of the wind.
Page 19 - In summer, rain probable within 12 to 24 hours. In winter, rain or snow, with increasing winds, will often set in when the barometer begins to fall and the wind sets in from the NE.
Page 12 - Because of the rotation of the earth, however, winds in the Northern Hemisphere are deflected to the right, and those in the Southern Hemisphere are deflected to the left.
Page 17 - Very high waves with overhanging crests; sea takes white appearance as foam is blown in very dense streaks: rolling is heavy and visibility reduced.
Page 17 - Wind felt on face; leaves rustle; vanes begin to move Leaves and small twigs constantly moving; light flags extended Dust, leaves, and loose paper lifted; small tree branches move Small trees in leaf begin to sway Larger tree branches moving; whistling in wires Whole trees moving; resistance felt walking against wind Whole trees in motion; resistance felt walking against wind Slight structural damage occurs...

About the author (2003)

Greg Davenport is a globally recognized survival professional with more than 17 years experience as a wilderness educator. He lives in Walla Walla, Washington, where he operates Simply Survival, a wilderness education program.

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